My Fluoride Detox Update: Magnesium Supplements and Magnesium Oil

19 Oct

It took about two weeks for my face to heal from my anchovy experiment, but now I’m ready to continue my fluoride detox effort.

Next on the list: magnesium supplements.

Fluoride Detox and Magnesium Deficiency

The most persistent detox symptom I’ve experienced throughout this whole process has been water retention around my stomach.  It was at its worst during this last round.  I started to suspect that my detox efforts could be causing a mineral deficiency of some sort, and magnesium was the prime suspect.

In The Magnesium Miracle, Dr. Carolyn Dean tells us that:

Fluoride seeks out minerals such as magnesium and binds with it, making magnesium unavailable to the body and unable to do its work.  The magnesium-fluoride mineral produced is called sellaite; it is almost insoluble and ends up taking the place of magnesium in hard tissues like bone and cartilage… The reduction in available magnesium causes a decrease in enzymatic action in the body.

Could all that displaced fluoride in my body be contributing to a mineral deficiency by making it unavailable for its normal functions?  Dean also writes that “magnesium inhibits the absorption of sodium fluoride.”  Could it be an important ingredient in a fluoride detox program?

Magnesium Supplements and Fluoride Detox

I decided to add a magnesium supplement to my detox plan.  At the very least, I figure it would help boost my magnesium levels.  According to Dr. Dean, most Americans are deficient in magnesium.

The first supplement I tried was Ionic Magnesium from Trace Minerals as mentioned in “Magnificent Magnesium,” an article by Katherine Czapp on the Weston Price Foundation website.  I liked that it came in liquid form and therefore you could easily start with a small dose and divide them throughout the day, a technique Czapp refers to as “micro-dosing.”

The recommended dose is .8 teaspoons.   I started with approximately .25 teaspoons.  (I wish I was more precise about noting exactly how much magnesium I took.  I didn’t realize what a significant reaction it would cause at the time!).

Within the hour, I felt an overwhelming urge to take a nap.  For the next two hours, I might as well have been sleeping on the moon.  When I awoke, it took a while to reorient myself.  Silly me wondered if my deep sleep could have been related to the magnesium.  After reading Dean’s book, I now know the connection is well established.

A few hours after my nap, I experienced another established side effect of magnesium supplementation—the runs.  That’s when I decided I better read Dr. Dean’s book before I continue taking any type of magnesium supplement.

Take Two with Magnesium Supplements: Magnesium Taurate and Magnesium Oil

Dr. Dean recommends a few different types of magnesium supplements in her book.  She says magnesium citrate is best for general use.  I considered taking the popular Magnesium Calm from Peter Gillham, but decided to go with magnesium taurate instead even though it’s more difficult to find.

Magnesium taurate is magnesium bound with taurine, an amino acid.  I had just read about taurine in The Mood Cure by Julia Ross where she talks about its importance in handling stress.  It was one of the aminos I thought I might be deficient in.  According to Dr. Dean, chelated magnesium is best because it is less likely to cause digestive issues, however it’s more expensive than other forms of magnesium supplements.

I was hesitant to take that first pill, but I did so without incident.  I didn’t experience any side effects other than a good night’s sleep.  Still, I’m starting slow with my dosage.  Dr. Dean suggests 600 mg of magnesium per day, but I still haven’t worked my way past one pill (125 mg) and even then I don’t take it every day.

I’m also supplementing with magnesium oil.  This is another way to replenish a magnesium deficiency without risking digestive upset.  It’s not actually “oil,” but a high saturation of magnesium chloride in water.  I am using the Ancient Minerals brand and I like it so far.  It absorbs quickly without stinging (although I don’t recommend applying it right after you shave. Trust me!).

It’s amazing how soundly I’ve been sleeping since I began supplementing with magnesium.  I hope addressing this deficiency will help restore my overall mineral balance, which I suspect plays a major role in my fluoride detox efforts.

Have you tried any of the magnesium supplements I mentioned?  How do you ensure your body is getting the minerals it needs?

*This post is part of Monday Mania, Real Food Wednesday, and Works for Me Wednesday.


Creative Commons License photo credit: anw.fr

A Cellulite Investigator Update

Thanks for stopping by The Cellulite Investigation.  Things are a little quite around here at the moment.  I’m taking an extended break as I get married and settle into married life and a new home.  Don’t worry, I’ll be back soon!

Comments

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herama says:
10/19/2011

I’ve been taking a calcium/magnesium/zinc supplement forever. Funny thing- I went to see how much mag it contained, and realized I’ve been out of the supplement for an unknown period of time. I take SO many supplements now that I didn’t even notice!! I think it’s time to reassess my supplement taking…I recall looking into magnesium some years ago for the sleep aspect. I don’t remember what, if anything, came of it. For some reason when I read your post I had some flitting memory of stomach upset or nausea, but I can’t say that happened with any certainty.

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That’s the opposite of me, herama. The magnesium supplement is the only one I’m taking right now, along with the occasional cod liver oil.

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Robin says:
10/22/2011

Perfect timing on this post. Cheeseslave also posted on magnesium this week which has led me to do my own research on it, as I am trying to find ways to help with OCD. Seems magnesium deficiency is related to a TON of different issues, but I haven’t quite decided which form to use. I’m leaning towards the liquid spray (seems your skin can absorb it better?) but am also trying to figure out if I need to also supplement with calcium/zinc in addition to the magnesium. I’m already taking so many supplements (as I am also reading The Mood Cure and am supplenting with several aminos plus a few additional items recommended by an ND I recently visited) that in some ways I am hesitant to add any more, but I am kind of blown away by the info I’ve been reading on the magnesium. Interesting stuff!

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I really like the magnesium oil. I’m hesitant to take mineral supplements because of the reaction I had to the cal-mag supplement I was taking (see My Effort to Detox Fluoride with Boron). I liked the idea of taking magnesium oil because it goes directly into the skin instead of having to go through the digestive system. I haven’t experienced any negatives side effects from it at all and I’ve been using it for a couple weeks, although not every day.

I’ve also been taking one pill of magnesium taurate (125 mg —Ross talks about taurine in her book, too, and I’ve definitely noticed an improvement in mood since I started taking it). I haven’t experienced any negative effects from that either. In fact, my digestion seems to be even better than before. I’m comfortable enough now where I feel like I can build up to a fuller dose. I’ll let you know how it goes!

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D. says:
10/24/2011

Taurine is plentiful in red meat. When I quit smoking 14 years ago, the program I used was given to me by a “health-nut” friend. I had to avoid anything ending in “ine” such as caffeine, taurine and, of course, nicotine. I also drank about 2 gallons of water every day (which wasn’t popular at the time like it is now). I don’t remember having a terribly hard time resisting cigarettes because I was too busy peeing! Cleaned all the old nicotine out of my system and in 2 or 3 days I didn’t care if I never saw another cigarette and haven’t had one since. Haven’t even ever wanted one. I do love the smell of a good cigar or pipe, though. I’ll never lose that, I guess.

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That’s interesting. Ross’s book, The Mood Cure, is based on her years of work with addiction therapy. She has found that supplementation with specific amino acids such as taurine (depending on the condition) are extremely effective at helping people overcome addictions. Her theory is that deficiencies in these amino acids are what contributes to the addiction in the first place. I don’t remember which ones she recommends for smoking, though.

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D. says:
10/24/2011

I use MgCl (mag chloride) in tablet form. Super stuff, and will not give the runs as easily as the other forms of mg. Also, if you bump up the dose when you feel illness coming on (like a cold) you can wipe it out fast. I recently had a sore throat and began taking 2 tablets, which equals 1,040 mg, every 4-6 hours and by the end of mid-day I could already tell a difference. In two days the mere idea of having had a sore throat vanished. Look up mgcl online, rather than having me supply a link. It’s best for you to do your own research, that way you won’t think I’m biased. ;->

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I’ve had great success using fermented cod liver oil and rose hips (for vitamin C) to stave off colds. The only time I had a cold in the last few years was when traveling and I didn’t have access to my supplements! I’m going to stick with the magnesium taurine for now since it’s going so well, but I’ll file this info away for future reference. Thanks, D.!

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Jan J says:
10/24/2011

This a very timely post for me! I just bought some liquid magnesium TODAY and was about to take it (it said take after a meal). Now I’m going to wait until tonight after dinner, in case I have some crazy reaction like you mentioned.

In August I cut out all sugar, most grains, and pasturized milk from my diet. I eat mostly meats and vegetables, and limited fruits. In the last 3 weeks my teeth have started to hurt… an achiness inside the tooth, and kind of along the gum line. I did some research and I think it might be a magnesium deficiency that is causing this. But now I know to be very careful as I supplement with magnesium!

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I’m glad you could learn from my mistake, Jan! the liquid magnesium was not the best option for me to start with. :) Strange about the teeth. Any idea why the change in diet might have caused a magnesium deficiency? Let us know how the supplements go if you get a chance!

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D. says:
10/25/2011

@ Jan J: You should read this book by Rami Nagel:

Cure Tooth Decay by Ramiel Nagel
He says:
“The idea of curing tooth decay is nothing less than highly controversial in our society. In fact, most of us have never even heard of cavities remineralizing, much less realized that it was our diet that could make it happen! Nagel covers every aspect of holistic dental care, including popular myths about dental health and what foods can help heal our teeth.”

The book isn’t just about tooth decay and caries, but also about remineralizing the teeth – and lots of other things we can do, nutritionally to help. The TV can blast out the message about re-enamelizing teeth from now til the cows come home, but that’s not possible. You cannot re-enamelize teeth no matter what fancy toothpaste you buy.

There are a lot of young mother’s (of which I’m not one anymore!) who are doing this with their kids. I’ve read articles at Kelly the Kitchen Kop, The Nourished Life and a few other blogs about it recently. Eating lots of proper fats is key to health. Many people are brainwashed by the TV into believing that saturated fats are bad for you. Well, not all of them are bad and that’s a proven fact. Following the principles of the WAPF has done a world of good for many, many people, including my family. I was raised eating a proper diet, but today’s families are not inclined that way, it seems.

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Jan J says:
10/25/2011

Thanks, D.!

I will definitely look into that.

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This is a great book, D.! I read it a few months back and wanted to write about it more on the site, but I didn’t get around to a full review. So many books to read, so little time to write about them! Thanks for taking the time to pass this info along. :)

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Christopher says:
10/24/2011

Melissa, WOW! So glad I found your blog. Although, not for cellulite-reasons, I have began the Fluoride detox process. I grew up in a non-Fluoridated community, but now in College, I live in one.
Anyhow, after reading your experience I thought I would share:
I distill my own drinking water (which can be considered “hungry”, and void of nutrients.) Some say that distilled water can leach nutrients from the bones, so I began taking calcium/magnesium/zinc,etc…
If this water does attract and draw out excesses, perhaps that is why I have experienced no bloating? I am only now beginning to wean onto Iodine, but I have been using Cilantro for a few months. It is very powerful. If I eat too much (a bushel the size of carrot) I break out itching anywhere I sweat. I imagine this is because of the Cilantro’s strong chelation abilities…?
I drink one shot of wheatgrass daily as well, and my body is constantly flushing… Have you considered distilled water to leach fluoride-bound minerals from your body? I recently read that after leaving the liver, many toxins (and bound minerals) can wind up in the intestines, waiting to be flushed out. The trick is flushing them before the intestines reabsorb them….? lecithin and omega-3 might help protects cells from harmful re-absorptions. Have you looked into high doses Vitamin C?
Sorry so long winded, just got excited about your blog. So good to see others trying things!

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Thanks for all the ideas, Christopher! I used to drink distilled water when I first figured out that fluoride was causing my acne. I was pretty much afraid to drink anything else. I’ll have to try it and see if it helps with the detox reactions. It’s an interesting theory!

Cilantro does pack quite the detox punch, doesn’t it! The first time I had raw cilantro, I broke out in an itchy rash, too. It was mostly around my ears and neck. It’s funny I haven’t experienced it since then. Do you use fresh cilantro or dried? I decided to stop buying the fresh stuff because I always try to eat it all before it goes bad, and that’s just too much for my body to handle. I either have to start growing my own, or add the dried herb to my meals. I haven’t decided which one, yet.

It’s funny you mention wheatgrass. I just saw it at Whole Foods yesterday and wondered if I should explore that further. That’s one popular health food I haven’t looked into yet.

I supplement with omega-3 from a high quality fermented fish oil and I get my vitamin C from rose hips (I put a spoonful or two of dried rose hips in warm water and drink like a tea). I haven’t tried lecithin supplements, although they are supposed to be good for cellulite, too (I know you’re not interested in that, though!). Do you take lecithin as part of your fluoride detox? If so, is there a brand you like best?

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D. says:
10/24/2011

I take the magnesium oil with me every month when I have a foot massage/reflexology (for neuropathy). It’s sticky and it makes my skin itch, but I’m hoping for some relief from the numbness in my feet. It is not diabetic neuropathy.

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That sounds like a scary condition, D. I hope the magnesium oil and reflexology will at least provide some relief!

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D. says:
10/25/2011

I believe my neuropathy came from one of two sources: 1.) either from a flu shot I unwisely agreed to back in 2002, or from the use of whey protein when I was on a “food program” back in 2003. I was diagnosed with neuropathy in 2005. Sarah Pope recently had an article on her blog ( thehealthyhomeeconomist.com ) about how whey protein has just recently become a suspect in this condition. It’s interesting how we can wreck our bodies just trying to get healthy. That’s also how I feel about people who exercise themselves into a frenzy every day, or run/jog until they nearly drop (some really do drop) – - – dead, dead, dead. Walking is a perfectly acceptable way to exercise at any age. I try to get in at least 2 miles every day or at least 5 times per week, because it helps me to relax. I also like to swim and water-walk, and in the winter my DH and I cross-country ski and ice skate as much as possible. We are winter people! Cold weather energizes both of us for some reason.

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Wow, D. I just read your comment about that on Sarah’s blog. I didn’t realize it was in conjunction with your experience on the Fat Flush plan. We looked into Gittleman’s book a while back, but I only extracted a few cellulite-related ideas, such as cranberry juice to energize the lymphatic system and eating more lecithin from egg yolks. I never went on the whole program. The part about the clorox food soaks was disconcerting.

I’m not much of an exercise fanatic either. I LOVE yoga, rebounding, and gentle workouts like that. After reading Good Calories, Bad Calories, I wouldn’t be surprised if I never went on a long run again in my life!

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D. says:
10/26/2011

Yep, it was Fat Flush. I questioned the use of so much whey protein but knew little about it until I found WAPF and read the explanation for how foods are made into powders and how it denatures them. Never really gave it much thought before that, I guess.

Ann’s program is well thought out otherwise, though. I learned soooooo much about health and nutrition from that program, both good and bad. But it got to be very boring and my family didn’t want to eat that way, so I was cooking two meals at every sitting. My youngest son was still living at home at that time and wasn’t at all interested in some of the foods, but he did like the cranwater and the smoothies. My DH liked the braised meats and stuff, but he kept saying “where’s my potatoes? Where’s my noodles?” He is used to dinners which consist of bread, meat, potatoes and a vegetable. He also would never have been able to make a smoothie big enough to last him until a morning snack! He’s a firefighter/EMT and needs more subsistence than that, but when we found out it was ok to eat any kind of protein for breakfast he was ok with it. He would eat leftover chicken breasts or leftover vegetable beef soup or whatever was in the fridge – for breakfast. His crew used to eyeball him suspiciously when he would show up at the station with a hamburger patti in his hand for breakfast!

I think the most boring part of it was the spices we had to choose from. I don’t like cilantro AT ALL and we were supposed to be very careful with things like cinnamon and nutmeg and some of my other favorites. I’m Swedish and I use lots of nutmeg, allspice and cardamom, so pretty much avoiding those was hard for me. My Mom made all of our meats with spices like that rather than the herby type things like bay leaf, etc. The program may have changed by now (I think she was revising the book AGAIN when I left the program. The other part I didn’t care for was the blatant selling of her books and supplements. It seemed as though I just got one book, and then I had to buy another for something else we were supposed to be doing. I finally said enough.

But bar none, having found that original book and being on the program certainly led me to look more closely at what we were eating back in the early 2000′s, to be sure. I will always be grateful for that, and for some of the lovely friendships I made (and still have) with the other participants. I was just starting to learn to use a computer back then, so being on a forum of ladies all talking about the same topic was quite heady! It doesn’t seem that long ago, but it’s been 8 years.

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Wow, it sounds like Fat Flush was a life-changing experience for you, D. It’s impressive you could take that away from a diet plan! I learned a lot from her book too, but I didn’t venture into the forums much. i wonder why you’re not supposed to eat certain spices. I never thought of those as potentially unhealthy. My significant other loves our “diet plan.” He eats farm fresh eggs every morning with various kinds of breakfast meats, lots of steak, chili, burgers, homemade soups. It was an adjustment to give up all the sugar, but once you get over that initial hurdle it doesn’t feel like a sacrifice as you start to taste the natural sugar in fruit and other foods more. Being from Sweden, I’m sure you have lots of delicious traditional foods in your repertoire. This conversation is making me hungry!

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D. says:
10/27/2011

Spices aren’t unhealthy, so to speak, but they do each have different qualities and can be medicinal just like herbs. Cinnamon, for instance, is used “medicinally” to help lower blood sugar, etc.

That’s why the Swedes use certain spices for various dishes. Allspice with beef, nutmeg with pork, etc. How the earlier generations knew this stuff (or even figured it out) is beyond me but know they did! My DH and I are both really into studying ethnobotany because we live in an area of the country where there are still many indigenous Native American tribes. In fact last month we went to a Cord Ceremony for a NA baby, where he received his official NA name and his eagle feather. It was a very impressive and beautiful ceremony. Those people knew a LOT about herbs and berries and grasses and tree barks, etc., and figured out how to best use them to stay healthy, seeing as how back in the early days of this country there wasn’t a doc-in-the-box on every corner. DH and I are both fascinated with their heritage botanical knowledge.

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D. says:
10/27/2011

Oh, BTW, I’m not from Sweden, but my heritage is Swedish. My paternal grandparents were both Swedes and my maternal grandparents were a mix of Swedish and German (although it used to be called Prussian – I guess a cross between German and Russian or something). I actually live in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

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That sounds fascinating, D.! I just read Healing Plants: Medicine of the Florida Seminole Indians. I haven’t had a chance to write a post about it yet, but it held a lot of information that I found relevant to our investigation. I had to return it to the library this morning so hopefully my notes will suffice for capturing it all in a blog post!

I can see why spices can have medicinal properties, but why would you need to avoid certain spices to lose weight?

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D. says:
10/27/2011

Same question I had! I would imagine since Ann is a very schooled nutritionist, she knows why she allowed certain spices and not others, but it beats the socks off me, too. All I know is it got pretty boring and having to measure everything to the gnat’s nuts didn’t set well with me either. I learned to cook from my gramma’s and my Mom and they didn’t measure anything, much less weigh their food. How ridiculous, right? I just knew I didn’t want a lifetime of that sort of restriction.

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Weighing all your food? That would be annoying. It’s nearly impossible for someone to come up with a good diet plan if they don’t understand that eating fat doesn’t make you fat. I recently read Michael Pollan’s Food Rules and a third of the book was devoted to ways to get yourself to eat less. He talked about how the French eat all kinds of fat yet they don’t eat as much as we do so they don’t get fat. But he just doesn’t understand that they don’t eat as much as we do because they eat all that fat. It’s more satiating so they’re not left feeling hungry. Without that key info, diets becoming about restriction and it’s just unnecessary.

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D. says:
10/28/2011

Exactly. That’s why my DH and I were so glad to be brought up in an era where real food still meant meat and fats and cheeses and raw milk, not just veggies and fruits. I never understood how people thought they could maintain any kind of health without proper good fats. We are like cars and need oiling, too. People like Pollan make some good points, but they miss the big picture. Sure glad we didn’t!

My only complaint is I wish I could find more ways to use soured raw cream and raw milk. The farm where we buy our milk only sells milk in gallons and cream in quarts and now that it’s just DH and I at home, I have trouble using it all up sometimes, so it naturally sours in the fridge or I make clabbered milk – and butter from the cream. But my freezer is full of butter to use for baking and I can only use about so much clabbered milk before I’m out of ideas (like now). Any suggestions along those lines? Thanks for any ideas or links you can provide.

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Have you tried kefir? That’s what I used to do with my raw milk when it started to sour. Then I would turn it into kefir fruit smoothies. Yum!

Here’s more info about kefir and how to make it: http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefirpage.html

Wish I lived closer to I could borrow some of that homemade butter! :)

Christopher says:
10/26/2011

Wheatgrass has really been a lifesavor for me!

Anne Wigmore, founder of the the Hippocrates Health Institute, wrote in her book “The Wheatgrass Book,” on page 62

“A few years ago, I asked Dr. GH Earp Thomas of the Bloomfield Laboratories in High Bridge, New Jersey, to do an experiment for me. He placed a small amount of wheatgrass juice in a jar of regular tap water and he tested it for fluoride and other chemicals present in the water… Both of us were surprised by the results! He concluded, “Fluorine rapidly combines with calcium phosphate and other kinetic elements to lose its toxic properties….. That is why fresh grass would act as a catalyst to speedily change the acid fluorine into…..an alkaline calcium phosphate fluoride combination with a positive reaction”.

Growing your own is FAR FAR FAR more affordable than buying it daily!
Give it a “shot” ;)

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Fascinating, Christopher!! Is her book worth a read? Does she mention fluoride anywhere else? I love a good book recommendation!

Did you see my post from today about my new prune theory for fluoride detox? This one is promising! Best Fruits to Detox Fluoride: Prunes

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D. says:
10/28/2011

I used to make a lot of kefir, but now that I’m the only one around here who likes it, I can’t drink so much of it anymore and my grains just petered out. They stopped growing and so I ordered another batch and the same thing happened. Evidently they are not designed to make small batches. I finally just gave up on the kefir. I don’t like the powdered kefir cultures – they’re gross and don’t produce as a nice a product as the grains. I’ve never made water kefir or coconut water kefir – never really was that interested I guess. Too much milk to use up to worry about starting any more projects. ; ->

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I was the only one that drank the kefir plain, but it was really popular in smoothies. It was easy to use it all up if I threw in a banana, maple syrup, and some frozen strawberries. Maybe you could get your DH to help you drink it then? How about any of these ideas for soured milk? (Some of them are not all that healthy but you could probably adapt them.) http://www.cooks.com/rec/story/121/

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D. says:
10/29/2011

Oh yes, he’ll eat it if I put it into a smoothie with fruit and stuff but he won’t make his own, and I have laid off smoothies for a while. I like them in summer but I prefer baked oatmeal and that sort of thing in the winter months. I can’t say I’m altogether crazy about plain kefir either though. I’ll drink it but I’d rather drink the Ayran recipe from http://www.tendergrassfedmeat.com

It’s fast, easy, nutritious – and I mix in a little warmed honey. YUM!

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Aryan sounds delicious. I’ll have to try it. Thanks, D.!

http://www.whatstherecipetoday.com/aryan.html

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Patty says:
3/18/2013

I have been taking ionic magnesium for close to two weeks now. When I first began, I slept so well. Now, I don’t sleep well at all. I began taking it by putting it in my tea and found myself unable to take the full dose (4 ml) so now I put it in my kombucha. I thought maybe it was because the dose was too high for me, but I’ve lowered it and still can’t sleep. Any ideas? Could it be the type of magnesium?

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martha brassil says:
4/4/2013

I find that sometimes the body needs to readjust to the magnesium supplements. As magnesium activates the ATP pump of the cell the body can go into detox mode and the energy can go quite high. I am very sensitive to taking magnesium and can only take one to two capsules a week! My daughter is the same as they make her detox so much that she feels very toxic. This puts a strain onto the liver which is what Max Gerson found with detoxification. This is why he recommended coffee enemas which are a great tool to use during any detox program.

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