The Ultimate Anti Cellulite Soup

Exactly one year ago, our Cellulite Book-of-the-Month was The Cellulite Cure by Dr. Lionel Bissoon.  Dr. Bissoon is widely credited for bringing mesotherapy to the United States from Europe, where it has been used as an anti cellulite treatment since the mid-1950’s.

Mesotherapy employs multiple injections of pharmaceuticals, homeopathic medications, plant extracts, vitamins, and other ingredients directly into the subcutaneous fat to dissolve cellulite.

Reading over our research from last April’s Cellulite BOTM, I noticed some startling evidence for our case.

An Enzyme that Dissolves Cellulite

One of the primary ingredients used in mesotherapy treatments is hyaluronidase, an enzyme known to break up glucosaminoglycans trapped in cellulite-laden fat cells (see, Proteoglycans in So-Called Cellulite). Haluronidase is a family of enzymes that dissolves hyaluronic acid, an element that can retain a thousand times its weight in water.  Hyaluronic acid is a natural moisturizing agent found in the eyes, joints, and skin.

Since my overarching philosophy on supplements is that food sources are always more effective, I was naturally curious as to what traditional foods contain this potent anti cellulite ingredient.  After some online investigative work, I found that concentrations of hyaluronidase are found in snake venom, insects and bacteria,  and certain “mammalian tissues.”

Hyaluronidase in Traditional Diets

This last possibility caught my attention.  I ran into this particular “mammalian tissue” on my travels in Africa, but never here in the U.S.  I told myself that if I ever did, I would not pass it up.

Then, about a month ago while vacationing in Florida, I noticed a curious type of beef soup on the menu at my favorite sushi restaurant.  The description read:

Rice noodles top with tender slices of beef, beef balls, beef tripes, beef tendon, beef flank, onion, and scallion in special recipe beef broth.  Served with fresh bean sprout, basil, hoisin sauce, and red chili sauce.  Soup lovers must try !!!

The name of the dish was “The Traditional Vietnamese Beef Soup,” also known as pho. I asked the chef just to verify; the menu description was not referring to normal “meat” balls.  Yes, the soup included beef testicles, one of the most concentrated sources of hyaluronidase.

Not only does pho contain slow-simmered bone broth (the star ingredient in my “beef stock theory” of cellulite), but it also contains beef tendon (pure connective tissue) and beef testicles (hyaluronidase).  Could it be more specific to targeting the blight?!

I’ll provide more info about beef testicles in an upcoming post.  It makes sense why the people I visited in Africa consider them to be a delicacy. Have you ever tried beef testicles?  Would you??

*This post is part of Monday Mania hosted at The Healthy Home Economist, Real Food Wednesday hosted by Kelly the Kitchen Kop, and Fight Back Friday hosted at FoodRenegade.

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Comments

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Hmmm, interesting that you would mention this as my husband has been requesting that I figure out how to make pho! He had some at a restaurant in California while on business last week. I’ll have to ask him if it had any beef balls in it!

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That’s too funny. What a coincidence! My sister-in-law is Vietnamese and she talks about pho a lot, but I never knew it is traditionally prepared with beef balls. I must say, they were surprisingly tasty, though. Kindof a cross between swedish meatballs and sausage.

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Barbara Grant says:
4/4/2011

We eat testicles of a variety of animals. We have eaten lamb, turkey, beef, goat, rooster, and duck. You would not believe the size of duck testicles!

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Wow, duck testicles? I would never have guessed! I have no idea if other types of testicles contain hyaluronidase, but it does sound logical. Do you simply fry them? I am intrigued!

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Shu Han says:
4/4/2011

Ah I’m not surprised by that at all! I’m also asian and I know we love using all the unloved parts of the animals in our stocks and stews. they’re so good for you! i wonder if you read anything about parts like pig’s trotters which are supposed to be really good for you because of the gelatin!

http://mummyicancook.blogspot.com/2011/01/pork-trotters-with-vinegar.html

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Fascinating article, Shu! It makes me wonder… what other foods are known as “confinement” foods in China?

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Kathy says:
4/4/2011

Or out here in the Northwest they are called Rocky mountain oysters! Groooooossssss!

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herama says:
4/5/2011

Gross. No.
But we have ALOT of pho around here. I live up the street from a neighborhood dubbed “Little Saigon.” I generally avoid pho b/c I don’t like MSG and I’m not too keen on commercially raised beef.
I don’t know about bull balls. The pho I’ve seen sometimes has meat balls, but I doubt they’re testicles b/c it would end up being too pricey if it were popular (considering there are only 2 per giant animal).
Further, I have shopped at many Asian groceries here in SF and while I have seen some interesting animal parts, I can’t say I’ve ever encountered animal testicles. Then again, I wasn’t looking for them!
I meant to write and tell you that I recently had ramen soup (very popular item here right now) at a japanese restaurant where they use pork broth for the base. On the front door of the restaurant is an article about how ramen soup is good for the skin b/c the long simmered bone broth (in this case from pigs) is chockful of collagen!

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Gross is all a matter of perspective! I met a waiter once who devoured our order of beef testicles after the owner of the restaurant kindly sent the dish to our table (beef testicles weren’t even the most “shocking” food in the dish). We nibbled at it to be polite and offered the rest to the waiter. He was overjoyed.

Very interesting about the pork broth. I was this close to buying a pig hoove last weekend to make stock, but I was not completely certain if the pig was raised organically (pork bones can be high in fluoride). Did you read Shu Han’s article above? Pork trotters are where it’s at! 😉

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Liberty says:
4/6/2011

LOVE bone broth – it’s the tripe I’m not too keen on…
I would try testicles, have heard they’re pretty good!
Blessings!
LIB
http://bit.ly/ibO3PU

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herama says:
4/14/2011

I imagine you’ve seen this article, but if not, here: http://www.jadeinstitute.com/bone-broth-health-building.php

The thing I found interesting was the bit about needing an acid (vinegar) in the broth to better release the minerals in the bones. Wouldn’t have known that!
I’m curious as to why they say pork bones not usually used in long simmered broths. Why??

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I hadn’t read that article. Thanks, herama. Great research, as usual! I thought I had mentioned the vinegar before. Sally Fallon recommends that in Nourishing Traditions, her famous cookbook about traditional foods. I used to use apple cider vinegar, but recently I’ve been using coconut vinegar which I stumbled across at Whole Foods one day. I really like its nice, soft flavor.

A lot of traditional societies are finicky about pork to varying degrees. I don’t fully understand the reasons why, either. (Traditional food advocate Jordan Rubin talks about this in his book, The Maker’s Diet but I can’t remember all the details.) I’ve stayed away from using pork bones for my stock. I know the type of fat found in animals that eat grass (cows, lambs) contains essential fatty acids that are particularly valuable in targeting cellulite, so I’ve been sticking to those.

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herama says:
4/19/2011

I really need to be studying right now, but…a friend and I both have GERD. I’ve been on various acid reflux meds for years. She has just started and has side effects. After reading about the possible long-term side effects of taking Proton pump inhibitors (i.e. anti-GERD meds), I want to stop taking the medication. So I’m reading up possible ways to combat the issue w/o meds. What do I come across? http://thehealthyskeptic.org/get-rid-of-heartburn-and-gerd-forever-in-three-simple-steps
Scroll towards the bottom of the page. Seems bone broth is quite the hot topic these days! I feel I need to find some truly organic, pastured bones. And alot of time. Can’t leave those things cooking on a gas stove while i’m out all day.

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Get thyself a crockpot, woman!

This is all wonderful progress, herama. Of course the sugar/digestive issues you’ve mentioned recently are a main source of your cellulite!

The bone broth is perfect for this. Have you considered ordering the bones from U.S. Wellness Meats? I’ve never ordered from them before but I was surprised to find that their shipping and handling fees are so low. I am considering putting in my first order with them because I found out they have lamb oysters!

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Kristi says:
4/21/2011

I love your blog! LOVE! I’ve been following for a while and thought it was time to chime in and thank you for sharing and being so candid. I am embarking on a journey similar to an Anti Candida diet, due to persistant, unexplained allergies. Mainly hives and skin rashes. Thanks to your blog, I finally got a slow cooker and am ready to start making broth.

The more I research, the more I can’t help believing that things like the blight (ha!), allergies, and yeast/fungal infections are all connected and caused by our toxic world and diets. I really wish I had known sooner….. I also just got a shower filter, and am waiting to see if that helps… I don’t have high hopes as I’m pretty sure our water here in LA has chloramine rather than chlorine, and as of yet there is no proven effective way to filter chloramine. Why do they do this to us? Argggh. Does floride cause problems for you only when you drink it? Sorry, I got off topic there. Anyway, keep up the amazing work!

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Kristi, it’s wonderful to finally hear from you! I only know a small portion of the people who are reading along so it is always nice to hear from the others, too.

I do experience breakouts from exposure to fluoride in the shower. I’ve heard from several other people who notice this same effect. One CI reader told me they can’t wash dishes for longer than 5 minutes without it causing another round of acne. Even if a filter isn’t designed for chloramine, it might be helpful at removing some of the impurities. Every little bit helps.

I’m honored to have inspired your crock-pottery. Let us know how it goes!

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Kristi says:
4/21/2011

I’ve been experimenting with Pho for a while now and this recipe/set of instructions definitely produced the best results. Makes the whole house smell so good too.

http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html

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Thanks for the link, Kristi! I ran across her recipe when I was researching this post, but I didn’t try it yet. I will definitely give it a shot now that it comes recommended (in spite of her excess of of “pho” jokes. I suppose they are hard to resist. :))

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herama says:
4/27/2011

HELP! So, I made lamb broth the other day in my new slow cooker. It was simmering w/in 2 hours on the high setting.
Today i start a batch of chicken broth. Put on high. 4 hours later, still not simmering! WHAT? Is the thing already broken? I forgot to add vinegar, so did so about 2.5 hours into cooking. But shouldn’t it have already been at a simmer by then? I left on low when I went out for afternoon. Come home 5 hours later, and it’s not even remotely bubbling. The chicken appears cooked- i.e. white and falling off bone. But I don’t have a thermometer and it seems wrong that it wasn’t simmering on high after 4 hours. I suspect this stupid cooker is broken after one use. 🙁 But the real Q I have: Is this even safe to eat? Or should I toss it? One thing I’ve read about the slow cookers is that leaving meat for too long at too low a heat breeds bacteria. My frined told me that even after boiling and killling the bacteria, their waste product (bacterial poo) is toxic. What say you?
And for future reference- how long does it take for your broth to come to simmer?

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Oh no, that does sound like a crock pot problem. Mine doesn’t take very long to come to a simmer (I leave it on high). Even if I don’t bring it to a boil beforehand on the stove, I would say it starts bubbling in about an hour or so.

As for the safety of the chicken stock, that is a really good question. I remember reading recently an article written by Dr. Ron Schmid about how he slow cooks all his meats at a very low temperature as part of his recovery diet from lyme disease. I can’t find the article now for some reason. I think it was on his blog which is now under construction. This article mentions it briefly, but the one I am thinking of had more details about how he cooks the meat.

You probably don’t want to know what I would do. If it looks good and smells good and I know it was made from good ingredients, I would happily eat it. I’m not saying I wouldn’t get sick, I’m just saying I would eat it. (insert disclaimer here) 🙂

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Peter says:
5/19/2011

Herama

I had GERD too, as well as hiatal hernia. After using stock every day as well as some extra organic gelatine every now and then in a glass of water for about 2 1/2 month these were gone. There are several reason why, but most important is the very high glycine content of gelatine (which also are a part of stock, along with minerals and glycosaminoglycans), which normalizes stomach acid production, which in your case probably are to low, even though you may have been told the opposite. There are many theories about GERD, some which are nonsense, and some which are a bit useful as long as you stick to them, like what foods to eat and not.

But the main documented cause of GERD is hypochlorhydria, a lack of normal levels of stomach acid, since the valve between the stomach and the esophagus only closes when it gets a hormonal signal from the stomach is has to. And this signal only comes if the stomach has produced a normal level of acid. So if you produce to little stomach acid this valve stay open when it should be closed.

I have used this knowledge on my GERD/hiatal hernia/stomach pain/stomach ulcer clients for nearly 14 years with only great success.

Some info that may be of interest –

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_2001_Oct/ai_78900837/
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_2001_Nov/ai_79757242
http://www.townsendletter.com/April2006/digest0406.htm
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_252/ai_n6160495/?tag=rbxcra.2.a.54
http://refluxdefense.com/heartburn_GERD_articles/stomach-acid.html
http://www.drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/Hypochlorhydria_-_lack_of_stomach_acid_-_can_cause_lots_of_problem

Why Stomach Acid Is Good for You: Natural Relief from Heartburn, Indigestion, Reflux and GERD – Jonathan Wright, M.Evans & Company, ISBN 9780871319319

Have fun 🙂

Peter

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Peter says:
5/19/2011

I Forgot info about glycine and stomach acid –

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7065145
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed003p797.1
http://www.wellsphere.com/digestive-health-article/gelatin-and-digestion/742055
http://movingstronglyforward.typepad.com/moving_strongly_forward/2009/09/what-i-never-knew-about-bone-broth-until-now.html
http://www.feedthis.com/additional.html

In the links to articles about gelatin/stock posted in another topic in here you’ll find quite a lot info about how gelatin normalizes stomach acid production, as well as how it heals any kind of intestinal inflammation, like colitis, crohns. ibs, celiac disease, leaky gut, etc., heal any liver disease and much more. Several nutrients in stock are involved, but the main nutrient are glycine, which is the main amino acid in gelatin. This means that you get the benefit of consuming more glycine than most people do, through consuming stock, but you can also add organic gelatine to accelerate the healing process.

And to Melissa; I apologize for posting non-topic info in your cellulite blog. However, lack of sufficient stomach acid is, as you will see from the links above, in particular this one (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_2001_Oct/ai_78900837/) so common today that this info should be a part of any blog or forum that contains info about eating more nutritious foods. More minerals and vitamins, etc are very valuable for most people, but not if they are not able to digest them. Probiotic foods and supplements for the intestinal flora, which are what the health food industry focus on, are only half the solution when it comes to digesting nutrients. And since lack of stomach acid creates imbalanced ph in the whole intestinal system and seriously mess with the digestion process in the intestines, good or “bad” bacterial flora or not, probiotic supplements are next to useless as long as you don’t have normal stomach acid production. Probiotic foods are only useful for stomach acid production if they contain organic acids like lactic acid, acetic acid, etc since these acids stimulate stomach acid production as well as helping digesting foods while stomach acid levels are low. This is why natural vinegar is so valuable for GERD.

Have fun 🙂

Peter

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Thanks for all the info, Peter! No need to apologize for not writing about cellulite. As you can see, nutrition has become the most critical factor in our investigation so it is important to gather as much relevant info as we can on the subject.

When you take gelatin in water, do you have to heat the water first to dissolve it? Does it matter if you drink stock as a meal on its own, or is it better to have it with meals? I was consuming stock every day for breakfast until I lost my source of organic, pastured beef bones. I tried using the highest quality bones I could find from a local butcher but they contained too much fluoride and caused my skin to break out. I finally ordered some pastured bones online and have another batch of stock simmering away right now. I’m looking forward to returning to my daily stock habit!

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herama says:
5/20/2011

Hey, thanks for the info. I actually just stumbled across the most amazing thing in the past few days for fixing the GERD symptoms. I don’t know why it never occurred to me, nor why I didn’t see it all the over the web. Acidophilus! I am taking it for, er, other problems. But the first day I took it (Tuesday) I realized at the end of the day I had experienced almost zero burning that day. As it was the only thing different that day, I thought it might be the acidophilus. Next day I took my supplements after breakfast like usual, the burning began, I took the acidophilus- pain GONE! Amazing. Truly. Amazing. It then occurred to me that common “cures” include sauerkraut and other fermented foods. What is in those? It’s not the acid, it’s the probiotics that supposedly help. I am amazed. Had a little burning last night (bad eating choices), took acidophilus, all burning went away. I have not had to take Tums, Alka Seltzer, nothing past few days. This is first time since I stopped the prescription proton pump inhibitor. First time in 15+ years!
I highly recommend. And of course, acidophilus has many other benefits.
I have looked it up on the web, and apparently my experience is not unique :).

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This is fantastic!! I get the feeling you just took a huge step toward cellulite recovery! It’s a long road, but it’s fun when you see massive improvements like this along the way. Are you taking acidophilus pills or some other form?

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herama says:
5/21/2011

I’m taking pills. Femdophilus. It’s quite pricey :(. But hopefully things will get better. In my case I am pretty sure why I have GERD. It’s a result of bad health history that’s probably not the same as most others.
Here’s an interesting article:
http://www.thehealthierlife.co.uk/natural-health-articles/cancer/mineral-prevent-oesophageal-cancer-00226.html
I’m trying to keep up on the broth. Just kind of a pain.

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That article makes a lot of sense. I never heard of the zinc connection.

Is this what you’re using: Jarrow Formulas Fem Dophilus? I’ve been taking this one but I want to mix it up with something else.

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herama says:
5/21/2011

Yep. That’s the one.

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Peter says:
5/21/2011

Herama, I just read the article you posted link to in your post april 19. and saw it did mention hypochlorhydria. Sorry about mentioning it again when you already did know about it. However, there is no logic or scientific reason why acidophilus bacteria should help GERD so fast, since these bacteria don’t work in the stomach, but intestines. I would rather think it was something else in the product that somewhat supressed the stomac acid, like fillers like milk sugars or other substances included with the bacteria. Lactic acid and other acids produced by bacteria can replace stomach acid in digesting food as well as stimulate the parietal cells to produce more acid, but since you use a probiotic bacteria product that does not include organic acids this cannot be the explanation why you feel better when using it. The only thing I can think of must be that your GERD/stomach acid problem did not start in the stomach, but rather from problems related to the intestinal flora, probably ph imbalance. And when this cleared up the effect went upward in the intestines, changing the ph and this way affecting stomach acid production through the hormonal loop between the duodenum and stomach cells.

Another logical as well as scientifically documented reason can be that it was candida overgrowth in your stomach that messed with the acid production. This because when the bacterial flora in the large intestine is imbalanced the ph becomes alkaline, which is a bad thing since it have to be slightly acid in this part of the intestines. When this happen, the natural candida changes form (some info – http://curezone.us/forums/am.asp?i=1452732) and start to grow upward in the intestines, and even into the stomach, where it interferes with acid production and digestion and causes gas and pressure when fermenting sugars/carbs. If you have or did have candida overgrowth because of imbalanced ph in the large intestine, caused by lack of lactobacteria, you should have other symptoms of candida overgrowth, in particular those related to the vagina because of the close proximity between the large intestine and the vagina. The product you mention, femdophilus, suggest you know this already.

As a sidenote, if you have any problems related to imbalance of bacteria or yeast/candida in your vagina a very useful thing to do is to use some coconut oil there. The problems will most probably disappear in hours, I have never heard from any woman it didn’t work wonders. However, to truly balance the vaginal flora you must first balance the flora in the large intestine.

Melissa; about gelatin, I don’t heat the water, there is no need to. You can drink stock on its own, and don’t need it to be a part of meals since the very high amino acid content, in particular glycine, stimulate stomach acid production to make sure it is digested.

About fluoride in nonorganic bones; without wanting to insult your intelligence I don’t think fluoride from such bones pose any problem since stock also is very high in calcium, which detoxify the small amounts of fluoride in nonorganic bones. If you are absolutely sure that fluoride from such bones cause problems, the real cause may be to little calcium and magnesium (these minerals work together) in your food or lack of adsorption of these, probably because of stomach acid problems. If your body do have the calcium it needs, as well as true vitamin D from animal sources, and/or true vitamin C (and not the syntetic chemical ascorbic acid), both of which detoxify fluoride, the fluoride in small amounts should not pose a problem, and the detox should not be felt or be visible to you.

Have fun 🙂

Peter

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Most people probably wouldn’t have a problem with the fluoride in non-organic bone broth, but it depends on how much fluoride they have been exposed to over their lifetime. I am hyper sensitive to fluoride, probably because of the fluoride pills my dentist prescribed to me when I was a child. Now it is easy for me to know if a food contains fluoride because my skin will breakout within a few hours of eating it (see the pictures here: My Fluoroderma Update). That is how I know the stock I made from non-organic bones contains a significant dose of fluoride.

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Peter says:
5/21/2011

Ps Herama; you write – It’s not the acid, it’s the probiotics that supposedly help – but seems not to know that what you call probiotics, lactic acid bacteria that is, actually do work because they downregulate the ph in the intestinal system. Acidophilus means “acid loving”, which is why they create a slightly acidic environment where the are located in the body, as well as outside, on the skin, as well as in kefir, yoghurt and the like. Lactic acid bacteria are called probiotics because they produce, among organic acids, enzymes, nutrients, lysozymes and more, also bacteriocins, which do control other kinds of bacteria. These bacteriocins are called probiotica (pro bios/pro life) because they control other microorganisms without damaging the host like antibiotica (anti life). So it is not the bacteria that are probiotics, but their products, bacteriocins. But most companies selling lactobacteria doesn’t seem to know this. However, my point is that when it comes to lactic acid bacteria like acidophilus and the rest, the main reason why they do good is because of the acids they produce, and not the probiotic substances.

These critters also do regulate the genes in the intestinal cells, protecting your body from any DNA damage that could turn normal cells into cancerous cells and from there to a tumor in time. Even better, the lactic acid they produce, actually switch cancerous cells back to normal cells by forcing them to use oxygen when producing energy instead of fermenting sugars. This is very old news, since the man who discovered this, Otto Warburg, did so in 1924, but it is not many who knows this today. These bacteria also produce butyric acid (also found in milk and milk products, butter in particular) which do somewhat the same, killing cancerous cells that is, making them commit suicide (apoptosis). Both lactic acid and butyric acid – both acids if you note – heal any kind of damage in the intestines as well as any kind of inflammation. This according to more than 50 years of research in many countries.

Since I did mention calcium and magnesium in my last post, let me add that lactic, acetic as well as butyric acid bind with these minerals in the intestines and make sure they are adsorbed if present in food. These acids are produced by lactic acid bacterias in any food you ferment as well as in your intestines.

As a sidenote, the amino acid glycine, which is found in large amounts in stock and/or plain gelatin, also bind with these two minerals and make sure they are adsorbed if present in the foods you eat.

Have fun 🙂

Peter

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Peter says:
5/26/2011

Melissa, when rereading your article searching for useful info I see you write about using hyaluronidase (which actually are 3 enzymes acting on hyalurionic acid) for cellulite. If you use broth the glucosamine in broth will deactivate this enzyme (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC155438/) if you are planning to use it. You seem to know hyaluronidase destroy cartilage/collagen, but may not know it destroys red blood cells as well. The spleen produces this enzyme when it wants to get rid of worn out red blood cells via the process called hemolysis. I guess your best bet in using this enzyme would be local, not consuming it. Bee venom is a good source 🙂

Have fun 🙂

Peter

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It’s an interesting article you link to, Peter, but I’m always skeptical of studies that use supplements in place of real food. My dietary philosophy is guided as much by traditional wisdom as it is by scientific studies. I try to take what I can from the studies and then combine it with what I know of healthy, traditional diets. People from many different societies eat bull or goat testicles, etc. and believe they are an exceptionally healthy food source. For me, it’s more natural to include these organs in the diet on occasion than it would be to use bee venom to treat cellulite. I see where you’re coming from, though. It would be a creative solution!

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Kev says:
2/20/2012

I think you are reffering to Bo Vien when you say beef balls as this is how it is generally translated on products or on menus. They are not made from testicles but are generally a completely macerated paste of beef shank, tendon, meat scraps, etc formed into a solid ball and then cooked through before packaging. Home recipe: http://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/vietnamese/00/rec0056.html. It is the asian beef meatball (or one of them anyways). Not that there is anything wrong with bull testicles, I have just never seen them in any Pho. Beef Balls yes.

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Oh dear, that is a major misunderstanding on my part, isn’t it! AHH!! Your description of “beef balls” makes much more sense. Now that you mention it, after writing this post I made lamb fries from lamb testicles and they tasted VERY different than the beef balls in the soup. I still think pho is an ideal soup for cellulite, especially if it is made with tendons, soup bones, and organ meats of organic, grass-fed cattle. Thanks so much for clarifying this for me, Kev!

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Katherine says:
2/6/2014

FYI — not all pho comes with “meat balls”; and not all “meet ball” = bull testies… It’s a delicacy. And did you say, you were at a sushi restaurant?

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Katherine says:
2/6/2014

^meat

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