Fluoride Detox and Borax (excerpt from my guide to fluoroderma)

20 Apr

[The following is an excerpt from the final chapter of my forthcoming guide to fluoroderma. What do you think? Is it interesting?  Too long?  Are the references convincing?  Thanks for any input you can offer!]

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I was puzzled by my body’s reaction to the iodine supplement.  I contemplated switching to the type of iodine recommended by Dr. Abraham but the large doses were concerning.

That is when Charles Hakala, the research specialists at Hakala Labs and co-author with Dr. Abraham of multiple papers for The Iodine Project, mentioned a small piece of information that altered my approach to fluoride detox. He told me boron might be even more effective than iodine at displacing fluoride from the body.

Boron does not receive much attention in the nutrition world.  This was the first I had heard of it in relation to fluoride.

Hakala was planning to gather a small test group to research the theory further.  The method would be similar to the urinary iodine loading test except subjects would be given a boron supplement in place of the iodine tablet.  Given my strong belief in the healing properties of nutrient-dense foods —and because I did not want to wait decades for the medical community to reach an agreement —I decided to conduct a research experiment of my own.

Boron and Fluoride Detox

My first step was to research the boron/fluoride connection on the Internet.  The evidence was sparse.  A study conducted in 1942 on insects and rats concluded that boron will bind with fluoride and “has some value as an antidote” to fluorine.[i]

Research conducted on rabbits led to the same conclusion.  “The high fluoride content in bone… decreases with the addition of boron.”[ii],[iii]

Eventually, I came across a study performed by medical researchers in China who used borax to treat 31 human patients with skeletal fluorosis.  By observing symptoms and monitoring urinary excretion of fluoride, the researchers concluded that boron effectively counteracts symptoms of fluoride toxicity in humans.[iv]

Other studies indicate that daily boron supplementation is an effective treatment for osteoporosis and arthritis by preventing calcium loss and bone demineralization.[v],[vi]

The research was scant, but it was enough to keep me intrigued by the theory.

Choosing a Boron Supplement

A few alternative healthcare sources, such as the popular Earth Clinic site, recommend borax as a folk remedy for displacing fluoride from the body.  Borax is a compound form of boron with oxygen and sodium attached.  It is commonly found next to baking soda in the laundry aisle (under the brand name “20 Mule”).

To detox fluoride, Earth Clinic recommends drinking a liter of water with a pinch of added borax a few times a week.  Forum participants reported strong detox reactions and the clearing of fluoride-related symptoms.  I was skeptical of the borax remedy.  I did not know if it was safe to consume a substance I currently used to clean my toilet.  Instead of resorting to borax, I decided to see what would happen if I increased the amount of boron in my diet.

The list of common foods that are rich in boron includes grapes, raisins, pears, nuts, peas, and beans.  Most sources claim meat and fish are poor sources of boron.

Having studied the subject of “traditional diets” for The Cellulite Investigation, I knew most non-industrialized societies relied on slow-simmered bone broths as their primary source of minerals.  Back when chicken soup was known as a healing food, it was made by simmering chicken bones and other leftover parts for several hours in a large stock pot.

Homemade bone broth is said to contain all the trace minerals needed to maintain healthy bones.  Does that mean it contains boron?

I could not find any nutritional data on the boron content of homemade bone broth.  Studies on poultry show that dietary boron significantly increases bone health by improving bone development.[vii].[viii],[ix]

[to be continued... ]


REFERENCES:

[i] Marcovitch, S., and Stanley, W.W.,  A Study of Antidotes for Fluorine.  The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. 1942; 74(2): 235-8 (abstract available at http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/74/2/235.abstract as of April 2011).

[ii] Elsair, J. et al.,  Boron as antidote to fluoride: effect on bones and claws in subacute intoxication of rabbits.  Fluoride 1981; 14(1): 21-9 (abstract available at http://www.fluoridealert.org/pesticides/1981.f.abstracts.htm as of April 2011).

[iii] Elsair, J. et al.,  Boron as an antidote in acute fluoride intoxication in rabbits: its action on the fluoride and calcium-phosphorous metabolism.  Fluoride 1980; 13(1): 30-8 (abstract available at http://www.fluoridealert.org/pesticides/1980.f.abstracts.htm as of April 2011).

[iv] Zhou, L.Y. et al., Effect of borax in treatment of skeletal fluorosis.  Fluoride 1987; 20(1): 24-27 (abstract available at http://www.fluoridealert.org/pesticides/1987.part.2.f.abstracts.htm as of April 2011).

[v] Nielsen, F.H. et al.,  Effect of dietary boron on mineral, estrogen, and testosterone metabolism in postmenopausal woman.  The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology 1987; 1(5): 394-7 (available at http://www.fasebj.org/content/1/5/394.abstract as of April 2011).

[vi] Newnham, R.E.,  Essentiality of boron for health bones and joints.  Environmental Health Perspectives 1994; 102(7): 83-5 (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1566627/ as of April 2011).

[vii] Wilson, J.H., and Ruszler, P.L.,  Effects of boron on growing pullets.  Biological Trace Elements Research 1997; 56(3): 287-94 (abstract available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9197925?dopt=Abstract as of April 2011).

[viii] Hunt, C.D. et al., Dietary boron modifies the effects of vitamin D3 nutriture on indices of energy substrate utilization and mineral metabolism in the chick. Journal of Bone Mineral Research 1994;9:171-81 (abstract available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8140930?dopt=Abstract as of April 2011).

[ix] Rossi AF, Miles RD, Damron BL, Flunker LK. Effects of dietary boron supplementation on broilers. Poultry Sci 1993;72:2124-30 (abstract available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8265501?dopt=Abstract as of April 2011).

A Cellulite Investigator Update

Thanks for stopping by The Cellulite Investigation.  Things are a little quite around here at the moment.  I’m taking an extended break as I get married and settle into married life and a new home.  Don’t worry, I’ll be back soon!

Comments

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Bethany says:
4/20/2011

I think this is great, the info is helpful and concise. I also saw the Earth Clinic’s recommendation about borax and was actually going to ask you about it. I agree, I am hesitant to try a house/laundry cleaning product (even if it is considered more “natural” than some) to help me detox. I’ve been thinking about getting some of the supplements you mention taking.

Reply
mhikl says:
4/8/2013

Boron, Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium are all minerals necessary for the body’s health and the first three make up most of our teeth and bones. Borax reacts with hydrochloric acid in the stomach to form boric acid and sodium chloride, *basic table salt). The boron content of Borax is 11.3% while for boric acid it is 17.5% or about 50% higher. Ingested boron compounds are rapidly and nearly completely excreted with the urine. http://www.health-science-spirit.com/borax.htm

Borax is not a soap or detergent but can be used to clean laundry just as magnesium can be used to soften the water that is also used to clean laundry.

If you check out Walter Last’s site you will see how beneficial Borax is. It actually takes less salt to be lethal than Borax.

From personal experience (after a lot of study) my osteoporosis hip is pain free, thirty years after the injury and the same number of years in manageable to extreme pain. My dog also no longer limps after including it in her raw diet.

Sadly, most heavily chemical fertilised soils are deficient in this mineral so our foods are deficient in it. Thankfully, I have enough Borax on hand to last me a lifetime should the government, like Europe and Australia decide to ban the sall of Borax.

Reply

Thanks for the feedback, Bethany! I am still shocked at how strong a reaction I had to Dr. Ron’s mineral supplement. If you suspect you have stored fluoride in your body, definitely start slow. I am curious to hear about other people’s experience detoxing with boron.

Reply
Yves says:
6/13/2011

Great website. I have long been a fluoride-hater (found out it triggerd headches for me) so I follow your experiments with great interest. I had tried ingesting borax in the past and it gave me diarrhea. I believe I have read that while borax is not harmful, once it mixes with stomach acid it causes problems.. Anyway I tried a boron supplement and it did not give me these problems. I just tried it for a few days, but plan digging it out of cabinet and trying boron again to see the effects.

I think you are on the right path with the halides and it’s connection to thyroid function. FWIW when I am on thyroid I notice cellulite go down. Junk food, and Pork fat makes it worse, but not beef or coconut oil. go figure.. probably the PUFA content plays a role.

Reply

Interesting. Hormones are definitely a big factor in cellulite. I’m hoping I continue to see improvement in that area throughout this detox. The pork fat that increases cellulite, is it high quality (organic, traditionally-raised, etc)? I noticed some beef stock contains fluoride and causes breakouts for me, even though beef stock is my primary detox food. It depends on the how the animal was raised.

Reply
Yves says:
6/19/2011

Not all of it was organic, but from whole foods, so kind of inbetween I guess. I also gained ~20 pounds around that time so that is a conflating factor. It really seemed to appear when I was eating a lot of lard/sausage so that’s why I am suspicious.

Have you tried infrared saunas? Supposedly they are good for cellulite, I am thinking circulation in general is important. I wonder if they would also help detox bromide. I was doing them for other reasons and stopped since I couldn’t tell if they helped or not. Might try them again just for the experimentation.

Have you done salt loading? I think that helps more with bromide, but might help with fluoride too?

Reply

I really feel the difference when I eat meats that aren’t properly raised. I’ve been tempted in the past to buy regular Whole Foods meats and local, “mostly grass-fed” meats from a local butcher. I’ve had fluoroderma reactions with both (although I’m okay with the occasional sausage from Whole Foods).

I’ve come to the conclusion that it makes a huge difference to use animal products that are truly organic (even if they’re not labeled as such, as is the case with U.S. Wellness products) and raised in the traditional manner (outside on pasture). This is especially important if you are eating animal fat since hormones and toxins are stored in fat deposits.

I want to try infrared saunas but I haven’t had the opportunity yet! It’s on my list of priorities for this year. I can see how they would be excellent for cellulite and detox in general. Were you using a sauna at a clinic or did you purchase one for your home?

Yes, I tried salt loading when I was taking iodine supplements and experienced persistent bloating and acne. It felt too extreme to be drinking so much water at once. I prefer to go the gentle route when it comes to detox, by providing my body all the nutritional support I can think of and then letting it take care of the rest.

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sam says:
7/25/2014

You know I initially had a bad reaction to 6mg of iodoral with chlorine smelling urine alergic hives and heartburn. I’ve since taken selenium and when I first took armour thyroid I had similar symptoms to when i took the iodine..here maybe 6 months later I can take iodine and have almost no symptoms. I hate the term detox..but it seems to be what happened to me.

Reply
Robert says:
6/14/2012

Just to let you now the suppoerting reports a fuoridealert.org have been removed.

I am trying Borax as a detox for fluoride anyway. I made up a 1L bottle of water with a couple pinches of Borax. Plan to drink 1/2L a day in small amounts throughout.

It is likely too early to tell but have noticed a flushing of the kidneys already (1 day – Very cloudy urine). I suffered a major concusion a few years back, and have felt like something has been ‘sitting’ inside my head since. I envisioned scar tissue. It seems to be gone today.

I will get back to let you know how things go.

Reply

Bummer! Thanks for letting me know, Robert. Unfortunately I can’t seem to find them anywhere else on the web. I guess the Fluoride Action Network doesn’t publish that info any more. It must have gone by the wayside when they did their big site redesign.

How is the fluoride detox going? Are you still consuming borax water? I can’t handle boron supplements AT ALL. Even in small amounts, they don’t do good things to my digestive system. I do much better consuming boron-rich foods such as prunes.

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Laura says:
10/28/2012

Thank you for your research! I am a flox victim and trying to find how to remove the flouride toxin from my body. I am looking for the best way, it seems boron is very useful, but i am as skeptical as you, its current uses are so strange to consider ingestion. Please continue your studies and theories, you are doing very well, and I look forward to further posts!!

Reply
marty says:
3/3/2013

I have arthritis on my left hand(stiff in the morning), found earth clinic ,good site ,and found your site,also good, however, your site solved a small mystery of mine, why chicken soup is good for you when your sick. With all the mineral and trace mineral it makes your body alkaline and raise the ph level in the body.

Reply
Lucas says:
2/8/2014

How can we test urinary fluoride excretion after consuming boron? I’ve been eating stinging nettles every day which have boron.

Reply
Sam says:
7/25/2014

Boron looks like it has very low toxicity. http://www.epa.gov/iris/toxreviews/0410tr.pdf
From what I’ve researched it has an unusual chemistry, and vigorously reacts with flouride at room temp to form bfl3. Boron is lighter than flourine so it has the potential to bind to around 5 times its weight in flourine. It reacts with the other halogens (bromine, chlorine, iodine) only at high temperatures. Note the section in there where men with a fairly high intake had a higher fertility(higher thyroid function generally causes higher fertility).

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