fluoride content turkey

Well, the reason is that fluoride in contact with the teeth is an excellent protective element, and in effect avoids cavities, but consumed in greater quantities than recommended when the teeth are forming can produce what is known as fluorosis, which is an affectation of the maturation of the enamel that causes stains on the teeth and, if the consumption is high, can even affect the bones, making them more fragile. What do we say then, use fluoride or no fluoride pasta? Or do we clean their teeth without pasta as recommended by many pediatricians?

2010/12/fluoride-content-turkey.html

Fluoride in the water

For decades, fluoride has been added to public drinking water because at the time it was seen that populations with more fluoride in the water suffered less cavities. It was chosen to do so globally and everyone who drinks tap water and cooks with it is consuming a little fluoride every day to prevent cavities, including children.

Now, it has been seen that although it is a useful measure, the best results are given when fluoride comes into direct contact with teeth, rather than when consumed, and that is why it is so important that children’s teeth are washed with fluoride toothpaste.

Shouldn’t they then remove fluoride from the water? Not really, because the amount that bears the drinking water is already adjusted to a safe level that does not allow the fluorosis of the children, but to help prevent cavities (and adults also). Both the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) and the Spanish Society of paediatric dentistry (SEOP) are in agreement with continue water fluoridation as a method of community health.

Fluoride in toothpaste

Since, as we have said, the best way to prevent tooth decay is for toothpaste to have fluoride, the latest recommendations say that we should use fluoride since the first tooth appears in a baby. In the past there was talk of the time when the first tooth appeared, but it has been seen that by then there are already babies with problems in the incisors and that is why the use of fluoride has been advanced.

Well, the reason is that fluoride in contact with the teeth is an excellent protective element, and in effect avoids cavities, but consumed in greater quantities than recommended when the teeth are forming can produce what is known as fluorosis, which is an affectation of the maturation of the enamel that causes stains on the teeth and, if the consumption is high, can even affect the bones, making them more fragile. What do we say then, use fluoride or no fluoride pasta? Or do we clean their teeth without pasta as recommended by many pediatricians?

Fluoride in toothpaste

Fluoride in the water

For decades, fluoride has been added to public drinking water because at the time it was seen that populations with more fluoride in the water suffered less cavities. It was chosen to do so globally and everyone who drinks tap water and cooks with it is consuming a little fluoride every day to prevent cavities, including children.

Now, it has been seen that although it is a useful measure, the best results are given when fluoride comes into direct contact with teeth, rather than when consumed, and that is why it is so important that children’s teeth are washed with fluoride toothpaste.

Shouldn’t they then remove fluoride from the water? Not really, because the amount that bears the drinking water is already adjusted to a safe level that does not allow the fluorosis of the children, but to help prevent cavities (and adults also). Both the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) and the Spanish Society of paediatric dentistry (SEOP) are in agreement with continue water fluoridation as a method of community health.

Fluoride in toothpaste

Since, as we have said, the best way to prevent tooth decay is for toothpaste to have fluoride, the latest recommendations say that we should use fluoride since the first tooth appears in a baby. In the past there was talk of the time when the first tooth appeared, but it has been seen that by then there are already babies with problems in the incisors and that is why the use of fluoride has been advanced.

Endemic dental fluorosis was first observed in visit, Isparta province, southwestern Anatolia, with enamel stains associated with high levels of fluoride (1.5-4.0 ppm) in drinking water about two years ago. The origin of fluoride has been attributed to the mineral content in volcanic rocks, consisting of pyroxene, hornblenda, biotite, fluorapatite, and basal vitreous minerals. There were also societies about 35 years ago where severe dental and skeletal fluorosis was observed in humans and livestock in the Dogubeyazit and Caldiran regions around the Tendurek volcano east of visitar, where natural waters were found to be fluoride levels between 2.5 and 12.5 ppm.

It has been hypothesized that fluoride, which could be transported by fumaroles or a analyzed washing tower, could be retained on the surface of certain minerals and then exchanged with OH ( -) in groundwater at high pH at the foot of the young Tendurey volcano. Dental and skeletal fluorosis has also been found to be endemic among residents of the village of Beylikova in the Eskişehir Province of the Midwest, to be visited, where the fluoride content of drinking water varies between 3.9 and 4.8 ppm. The origin of fluoride reared in natural waters was related to midnight fluorite, which was produced in the watershed near the village. During the survey carried out in the village of Güllü d’esme-Usak, located in the southwest of the visit, it was observed that the majority of the inhabitants born and lying in the village and aged between 10 and 30 years, showed mild to moderate levels of mottled enamel. The fluoride content of deep water wells used for drinking in the village ranged from 0.7 to ppm aloud. Amorphous microscopic fluoride in Pliocene Lake limestone was considered a possible source of fluoride in water.