The Surprising Results of My Shrimp Stock Experiment

20 Sep

Last week I wrote about my theory that shrimp stock is a key ingredient in the elusive anti-cellulite diet.

As we learned in this month’s Cellulite BOTM, The Cellulite Solution by Dr. Howard Murad, cellulite can be treated by returning moisture to the connective tissue in the skin (aka the dermis).  The dermis is the body’s primary water reservoir. If it is dehydrated, the entire body will suffer.  Since the dermis is built from glucosamine, it makes sense that adding glucosamine-rich foods to the diet will help the body rebuild the dermis and maintain proper hydration.

Dr. Murad recommends glucosamine supplements to treat cellulite in his patients, but I decided to try shrimp stock since it is in line with my “real food” philosophy.  Not only is it the richest source of glucosamine I could find, but homemade stock also contains other nutrients the body uses to build connective tissue –including ones we probably haven’t named yet.

I attempted my first batch of homemade shrimp stock last weekend. I used a simple recipe but the end product was something to marvel –a savory broth, light and satisfying at the same time. I used the broth as a base for a quick seafood bisque and inhaled three bowls that very evening. The next day I restrained myself to two.

I planned to incorporate a cup of seafood stock into my diet each day as an alternative to glucosamine supplements.  But by the third day, I noticed two unexpected side effects:  acne and water retention. The acne was concentrated along the sides of my chin, neck, and along my temples (the same areas I break out from the fluoroderma).  The water retention was pronounced and distinctly contained in my upper abdomen.   Strangely enough, these were the same two side effects I experienced when I started taking iodine supplements. That’s when I realized these side effects shouldn’t have been much of a surprise since shrimp stock is likely high in iodine.

So my adventures in shrimp stock are on hold until I can research iodine more thoroughly. The remaining stock went straight into the freezer and I immediately ordered Dr. Brownstein’s book on iodine therapy. It will be next month’s Cellulite Book-of-the-Month (BOTM), so expect a full review soon.

*This post is part of Monday Mania hosted at The Healthy Home Economist.

A Cellulite Investigator Update

Thanks for stopping by The Cellulite Investigation.  Things are a little quite around here at the moment.  I’m taking an extended break as I get married and settle into married life and a new home.  Don’t worry, I’ll be back soon!

Comments

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herama says:
9/20/2010

Arrrgh! Sorry to hear it.
Before i even reached your conclusion, I was pretty sure what the likely culprit woud be. Yep, iodine. Sigh. I was thinking about trying the shrimp stock, but had reservations due to what I see as a high probability of toxins in the shells. While shrimp don’t have a long life, their shells are a concentration of what they ingest, and depending on where you get your shrimp, the potential for environmental pollutants is pretty high. A boiled concoction of the shells therefore seems iffy.
I would really like to find a way to hydrate my cells, though. I have had a real issue with hydration for years, which (again), my doctor is at a loss to explain. I notice that even though I use moisturizer, my skin gets the dehydrated/wrinkly look. I drink more h20 than any human should, (1-2 gal./day. Not exagerrating). But skin and body show signs of dehydration regardless. Bah!
How else can we internally hydrate?? Does Murad have any other ideas? (I have no time to read his book right now, so I’m depending on you for the answers!)/

Reply
Melissa says:
9/20/2010

I’m not convinced the reaction was from toxins in the shells. I bought the best quality wild shrimp I could find (if there’s one thing I don’t skimp on, it’s food!). The reaction was exactly the same as what I experienced with the iodine supplement from Standard Process, a company renowned for their pure products.

I think the reaction was triggered by my body’s attempt to use the incoming iodine to displace other halogens that were already in my system –namely, bromine and fluoride. Unlike bromine and fluoride, iodine is naturally found in the food supply and it is an essential element for not just the thyroid, but every cell in the human body (we’ll learn more about this in next month’s cellulite BOTM, Iodine by Dr. Brownstein). When all those unhealthy halogens were released back into my circulation, it triggered a fluoroderma outbreak (the acne) and the water retention. I’m still moving forward with the iodine therapy, but I need to formulate a better strategy so I can digest it without any harsh side effects.

In place of shrimp stock, you could try homemade chicken stock from organic, pastured chickens (see the comments below). As for Dr. Murad, don’t worry. I’ll be posting more about his book for the rest of the month!

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herama says:
9/23/2010

I wasn’t suggesting your reaction was from environmental toxins – my reply was that I realized it was iodine before I came to that point in your post. I meant the concern for ME would be toxins. Regardless, sorry it didn’t work out. It would be a tasty way to combat cellulite. If the thought of boiled chicken feet didn’t creep me out, I’d consider the other poster’s idea. But alas, I can’t stomach it. :P

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You can make a good stock without the feet (although it doesn’t make for nearly as good a Halloween prop). I haven’t given up on the shrimp stock yet. I’m doing more research right now, but when I try it next time I’m going to start slow instead of downing three bowls in one night. Who would have thought soup could be so potent?!

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WordVixen says:
9/20/2010

I’ve been wanting to make seafood stock for a while, but since I’m not a huge seafood fan, I’m also a little wary of it. Can you get pastured chicken? Chicken backs are often cheap, and chicken’s feet are also cheap, but harder to find (though supposedly super high in chondroitin, and I would assume glucosamine as well). The skin is high in collagen too.

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Melissa says:
9/20/2010

I’m wary of chicken because I’ve had fluoroderma flare-ups as a result of the high fluoride content in the bones, fat, and skin (even when it’s “organic”).

(see, The Quest for Fluoride-Free Chicken)

I had brief access to pastured chickens when I lived in Florida. I didn’t get the same reaction from roast chicken, although I didn’t get around to making stock. I haven’t found a new source since I moved to Maryland.

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