Shrimp Stock: My (Hopefully) Magic Anti-Cellulite Elixir

15 Sep

Now that we understand Dr. Murad’s Cellular Water Principle (TM), it makes sense that the glucosamine supplements he recommends to his cellulite patients are often effective at reducing cellulite in a matter of weeks.  Glucosamine is the building block for the connective tissue throughout the body, including the dermis. If we strengthen the connective fibers in the dermal layer, the fat cells underneath will no longer push through the skin and create that unwanted dimpling effect. Ta-dah, cellulite solved.

Of course, I am simplifying matters in order to present this latest theory.  I still think hormones, essential fatty acids, etc. play an important role in cellulite recovery, but the elusive anti-cellulite diet continues to elude us thus far.  Maybe glucosamine will provide the missing element we’ve been looking for.  Eager to test our new hypothesis, I headed straight to the kitchen, soup pot in hand.

Why I’m Not Starting with Glucosamine Supplements

Instead of ordering the avalanche of supplements Dr. Murad recommends in this month’s cellulite Book-of-the-Month (BOTM), The Cellulite Solution, I am going to try to incorporate those same nutrients into my diet.

Dr. Murad recommends glucosamine supplements because glucosamine is not readily found in foods  –”unless you want to start eating unpeeled shrimp,” he adds.  Shrimp shells are an ample source of glucosamine, as are other animal bones.  In non-industrialized societies, shells and bones were important ingredients in the food supply because they were used to make rich broths and stocks.

Shrimp Stock for Beginners

If you are a Real Food aficionado, you might already be proficient at making chicken stock.  This is one of the foundational foods described in  Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions, the seminal cookbook of the Real Food movement.  Shrimp stock gets much less attention.

There is a recipe for seafood stock in Sally Fallon’s book, but it was overly complicated for  my humble kitchen skills. After a little Internet research, I was pleased to discover that shrimp stock is perhaps the easiest stock of all.  Since the shells are so thin, it doesn’t take nearly as long as bone broths.  I can see myself cooking a pot of shrimp stock even on weeknights.

I followed this simple recipe I found online, and my first batch of shrimp stock is simmering away as I write this.  The recipe says to cook the stock for 30 minutes, but I’ve let mine go for over three hours now (I also added butter to the olive oil in the beginning).  Each time I taste it, it’s richer and more flavorful than before.

The cellulite is still there, but I’ll keep you posted…

A Cellulite Investigator Update

Thanks for stopping by The Cellulite Investigation.  Things are a little quite around here at the moment.  I’m taking an extended break as I get married and settle into married life and a new home.  Don’t worry, I’ll be back soon!

Comments

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CelluScience says:
9/16/2010

Thanks for introducing this elixir to combat cellulite. By stimulating the building of connective tissue, it may aid in preventing fat cells under the dermal layer from pushing through and form deposits. Great read.

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herama says:
9/16/2010

Oh, here I go again…I feel like I’m always adding contrary commentary. So, sorry! That said, i’ve been taking a triple strength glucosamine and choindroitin supplement for a couple years for joint issues, and in that time I’ve seen an increase in cellulite. I am in no way implicating the supplement for the increase! Merely making the connection that, despite daily use of glucosamine, the cellulite on my legs has increased. Perhaps it would be worse had I not been taking the glucosamine. That’s not something I can say. Unfortunately, i did not notice any improvement in my skin (anywhere). I don’t even know that it helped with my joint pain! I guess I continue to take it as a preventitive measure.
Also, for those who decide to try a supplement, be aware they often combine with MSM, which helps some people, but can cause anxiety and insomnia in others (i’m an “other”).
I’ll step off my soapbox, now.

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Melissa says:
9/16/2010

No, don’t apologize for the commentary! That’s what The Cellulite Investigation is all about –combining our experiences to better understand what we’re up against.

You’re situation is particularly perplexing, herama. It’s as if something is overriding all your efforts. Any idea what it could be???

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Melissa says:
9/17/2010

I was thinking about your comment more last night, after reading Dr. Brownstein’s book, Iodine: Why You Need It and Why You Can’t Live Without it. He writes about all the nutrients the body needs in order to deliver iodine to the cells. Maybe glucosamine has companion nutrients as well (besides chondroitin) –other elements the body needs in order to absorb glucosamine and deliver it to the dermis and other connective tissue. This is why I’m starting with a whole food source of glucosamine instead of a supplement. Mother Nature tends to build all those companion nutrients directly into the food, even before we “discover” them and assign them a name.

I also think the form of glucosamine is important. Were the supplements synthetic? Studies have shown that synthetic supplements aren’t absorbed by the body the same way as natural supplements.

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Peter says:
5/10/2011

Herama, glucosamine or chondroitin does not work particularly well for cellulite, even though this doctor Murad says so.

Gelatin, or rather the very high levels of glycine and proline in gelatin, are better for collagen.

Have fun :-)

Peter

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Peter, what makes you think glucosamine does not work well for cellulite? Dr. Murad claims his patients see dramatic results when he starts them on glucosamine supplements.

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Sophie says:
5/27/2011

I have had cellulite for years and have tried everything to no avail…after a car accident this past march my therapist suggested Pure’s Ligament restore which contains vitamin c, glucosamine sulfate cartilage, hydrolyzed collagen, lysine,silica etc., I noticed a substantial improvement in my cellulite and firmness of the skin! That with the combination of derma rolling once a month for CIT (collagen induction therapy) my cellulite which was a grade 4 has virtually dissapeared! It took some time to see results with the derma roller but be patient after 3 months the results were amazing!

Reply

Sophie, this is wonderful news. Thanks so much for sharing! I added your comment to our collection of real life cellulite success stories and am already looking up Pure Encapsulations Ligament Restore on Amazon. I’ve been wanting to try derma rolling, too. Where did you buy your roller? thanks again!

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Peter says:
6/19/2011

Melissa, glucosamine is only a small part of the tissues that constitute the layers of the skin compared to gelatin (which is collagen). It may work for some, but in my experience, 22 years by now, it is better for cartilage problems. There are way more research that confirms gelatins (glycins and/or prolins) positive effects on collagen and skin than glucosamine, and I am generally very suspicious about doc’s that claim this or that patented supplement they perhaps sell themselves are supposed to be good for any ailment, when they doesn’t include relevant info. In Murad’s case gelatin, which cannot be patented by him, which means he get no profit from promoting it.

If I had cellulite and knew what I know about glucosaminoglycans as well as gelatin, I would have used both, as supplements or through food like bone broth. I started to use bone broth, homemade, when I was 15, because of some damages as well as a hiatal hernia caused by the same accident, and I recovered so fast most doc’s refused to accept it. They just could not accept it mentally since I didn’t fit any norm. Since then I have used bone broth almost every day and I still love the taste of it.

Btw, I guess you know that the “hydrolyzed collagen” in Sophies post are gelatin, so she used both products at the same time. Vitamin C and lysine are not needed if you use glucosamine or gelatin since they are used as they are by the body. It only needs vitamin C and lysine to make collagen from proteins. Bone broth (the collagen/gelatin part) are a good source of lysine anyway, with 400 mg in 100 grams

Reply

That is what I love about bone broth, and whole foods in general. You don’t need to understand or even know the name of every element in the food. Dr. Murad provided the clue about glucosamine being good for cellulite, and all we had to do was figure out which foods contain that element naturally. No one really understands all the ways the other elements in that food work together to bring about healing, but we don’t have to. :)

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bella says:
10/28/2011

Does anyone have an EASY bone broth recipe I can try…I’m a bit kitchen challenged. Also, when you say gelatin…do you also mean the kind of gelatin you can buy in packets and dissolve in water (like…what they sell for nail growth)? Sorry to sound dim…just want to be clear as I’m trying so many of these suggestions. Thanks!!

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Bella, do you have a slow-cooker? Here are instructions for the easiest way I know how to make bone broth: How to Make Beef Stock in a Slow Cooker. Food Renegade has a great post about how to make beef stock on the stove top.

Yep, the gelatin comes in a powder that you can dissolve in the stock. I bought this kind from Bernard Jensen. I’m excited that you are experimenting along with us. Please let us know how it goes!

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bella says:
10/28/2011

Melissa, have you seen improvement in your cellulite through any of the theories you’ve tried so far? I read many success stories on this site from people who have found their magic…and i know we are all different and must find what works for our body. You say above, “the cellulite is still there…” so I’m just wondering if you’ve seen improvement at all from any of these tactics? If so, please share!! I’m just starting to try some of them and would love to hear a summary of what you think has and has not worked for you or shown results. Maybe it will give me HOPE! Great website! THANKS for starting this website and for contributing such great info!!

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Great question, Bella! It’s been a few months since I wrote my last cellulite status update. Here is a link to the one I wrote back in June: Bone Broth Experiment and Cellulite Status Update. I’ll write another one soon. The biggest change since then is the results I’ve felt since I started cupping massage. It’s amazing!

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Peter says:
5/3/2012

Hi Melissa

While searching for something else I just found this info that may be useful for you if you don’t know about it already –
http://www.thedoctorwithin.com/collagen/collagen/

Have fun :-)

Reply

Hi, Peter. Nice to hear from you again! Thanks for the link! Very interesting. I just broke out the bone broth again. What is your latest health adventure?

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