The Rolling Pin Treatment: Does It Work?

26 Apr

I recently went to dinner with an old high school friend I had reconnected with over Facebook.  As often seems to happen with me, the conversation eventually turned to the subject of cellulite (would you expect anything less from your trusty cellulite analyst?).

My friend wanted to know all about the lymphatic system and fluoride and how I figured out it was causing my cystic acne.  Then, she told an interesting cellulite story of her own.

A few years back, my friend frequented a particular tanning salon. One day, she was paying for her session as another customer was leaving.  This particular customer had legs so flawless, my friend couldn’t help but notice them. Not an ounce of cellulite!

After the woman left, the salon owner told my friend the secret to her client’s stunning legs.  How did she keep them in such good shape? She used a rolling pin! This woman woke up each morning and ran a rolling pin over her legs to keep them vibrant and healthy.

I have to admit, after I heard this story I was quick to track down my rolling pin and test it out.  The rolling felt surprisingly good on the cellulite regions, much better than those little massagers on the back of some body brushes.

Has anyone else heard of the rolling pin treatment for cellulite?  Do you think it’s worth a try?

UPDATE: Read this post about treating cellulite in the gym to learn why I think rolling pins are a useful part of an effective anti-cellulite strategy. They are basically a mini foam roller, which therapists and physical trainers have been using for years to improve circulation (a classic cause of cellulite formation).

*This post is part of Works for Me Wednesday hosted at We Are THAT Family.

A Cellulite Investigator Update

Thanks for stopping by The Cellulite Investigation.  Things are a little quite around here at the moment.  I’m taking an extended break as I get married and settle into married life and a new home.  Don’t worry, I’ll be back soon!

Comments

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Elizabeth Walling says:
4/26/2010

Well, this has got to be the easiest methods to try out. No expensive creams or gadgets–almost everyone already has a rolling pin in the kitchen! Except now I'm going to be keeping my rolling pin in my bedroom if this works… ;)

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Please let me know how it goes, Elizabeth! I am dying to try it out consistently, but I'm starting to use this cellulite cream for a product review –I don't want to start two different treatments at the same time because I won't know which one to attribute any results to. Let me know if you are serious about trying it. Would love to have a fellow cellulite investigator write a guest post about this one!

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Amaryllis says:
4/26/2010

After reading a post from a fellow CI reader (can't seem to find it now, sorry!) where she mentioned asking her husband to use a rolling pin on her legs, I've spent the last few days thinking 'does the rolling pin help?' and planning on bringing it up in CI. So thanks, Melissa… this post was perfect timing for me! I'm going to give it a go too. I'll give up the dry brushing for a couple of weeks, so it's a bit more like a proper test (although I won't give up my coconut oil). I'll keep you posted, and look forward to your feedback too, Elizabeth.

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That's funny, Amaryllis. Maybe you were thinking of the anonymous comment on this post: Request For Information: Does Cellulite Hurt?". She is the one that reminded me to post this story from my friend.

Apparently, it's not that crazy of an idea. There's a lot of hits when you google "Rolling pin cellulite". Let us know how it goes, Amaryllis. Maybe we can include it in a sequel to your Cellulite Story?

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Elizabeth Walling says:
4/26/2010

I'll definitely give it a whirl, Melissa. I always have that problem when I'm experimenting with healing treatments and whatnot, I always try more than one at once and then I wonder which one's making the most difference. Guess I should be more patient and try one thing at a time, lol.

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Great, Elizabeth! I'm looking forward to hearing what you think of it. When trying a new treatment, it seems impossible to limit the factors to just one even when I try really hard. We just moved into a new house, so of course there are all kinds of new things here (different water, etc). No fluoroderma outbreaks at all here (yippee!!), so I hope to see more improvements in the cellulite department, too.

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Elizabeth Walling says:
4/26/2010

Did you happen to run into any specific methods for using the rolling pin? It doesn't seem too hard but I was wondering if you knew of any specific technique.

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You're right, it seems straightforward. I would just make sure to roll up the leg (in the direction of lymph flow). This article suggests using a one-handed rolling pin, but I think a normal rolling pin would work just as well:

How to Use Self Massage for Cellulite.

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Melissa B. says:
4/26/2010

Interesting…I've never thought of using a rolling pin on anything but cookie dough, but I could see how this might work.

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Kristin says:
4/26/2010

I'd be willing to give a whirl!

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Amaryllis says:
4/28/2010

I'm already missing my dry brushing, which makes my skin much smoother and healthier feeling and improves circulation. The rolling pin doesn't feel so good and sometimes hurts on my outer thighs. Am going to keep rolling but am going to have to go back to dry brushing at the same time. I'm not a good cellulite investigator… I flake out after 48 hours!

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No worries! It's virtually impossible to only test one variable at a time. You've probably been dry brushing for long enough to know how your body reacts to it and what results to attribute to something new. It's so important to listen to your body. If it's telling you the rolling doesn't feel right, maybe it's not the best approach for you. But I am glad to hear the dry brushing is still helping!

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Amaryllis says:
4/29/2010

You're right, Melissa, I think I will be able to tell if the changes are due to the rolling. Thanks for your advice!

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Anytime! You know I love strategizing about the blight!

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Nicole says:
12/10/2010

I actually did this to myself last year because I am a heavy woman and the arms of my computer chair were making dents into my legs. I got the idea based on the premise of the Vela-shape machine and how it rolls over the cellulite pockets and smooths things out. Well the target areas I wanted to correct were pretty firm and when I started to use the rolling pin it made the skin more supple feeling underneath. In other words, it worked to knead out the fat bump and smooth it out. I really recommend trying it of you have say a pouch of fat on the saddle bag area or something that is stubborn and see how it works.

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So interesting, Nicole! Thanks for sharing your experience. Did you notice any reduction in cellulite, too? I’ve been using the rolling pin on my legs again recently, and I’m amazed how easy it is to feel areas of congestion. I thought the pain associated with my cellulite was completely gone, but when I use the rolling pin I can tell it’s still tender in certain spots –mostly at the cluster of lymph nodes on my inner thigh. At least now I can only feel it with the rolling pin, and not when I’m lying still in bed (which was the case when I first launched The Cellulite Investigaiton). I’ll keep at it. Thanks again for your comment!

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Liz says:
12/13/2010

So, should we roll up towards the butt, or down towards the knee when we do our thighs?

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That’s a good question, Liz. I haven’t found an authoritative source for directions on this. I’ve been rolling back and forth, just like you would do with a foam roller. For a video demonstration, see Foam Rollers: Another Option for Rolling Out Cellulite. I hope that helps!

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