Is Gluten Intolerance Related to Cellulite?

30 Mar

As we discussed yesterday, fostering healthy digestion is a critical aspect of cellulite recovery.  Digestive disorders continue to be on the rise as we increase our reliance on the industrial food system.

In order to tackle this tough subject for our investigation, I thought it would help to bring in some outside expertise.  So to explain today’s topic of gluten intolerance, I’m excited to present our first guest post here at CI.  Please welcome, Liz Schau to our cellulite-investigating team (and while we’re at it, please show her some luv in the comment section if you are so inclined!).


Liz is a gluten-free guide for Examiner.com where she writes about gluten-free diets, news, research, and lifestyles.  She also writes a weekly column on nutrition and natural healing at DearThyroid.org. After identifying gluten as one cause of her systemic candida infection and eliminating it from her diet, her autoimmune thyroid disease has gone into un-medicated remission.  For Liz, identifying hidden food allergies has meant arresting the Leaky Gut process that was causing all sorts of symptoms, ailments, infections and impaired immunity.


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Gluten-free diets have become increasingly popular within the last few years — grocery stores are lined with gluten-free products, restaurants are catering to the food-allergic community, and eating gluten-free (GF) was even predicted as a top trend for 2010. And while many people who go gluten-less report healing in chronic ailments, conditions, and diseases, eating GF is often criticized as nothing more than a fad diet — a new and risky way to lose weight. But in fact, nothing could be further from the truth. Unlike other diet “trends”, gluten-free eating is based on solid science and groundbreaking nutritional information.

Gluten is a protein found in certain grains like wheat, rye, barley, kamut, spelt, and triticale. It is also added to most processed foods to enhance taste or texture. Because gluten can be a highly addictive substance, due to the opioids that are formed during the digestion of the protein, for many people, ingesting gluten is literally like ingesting a drug; a “comfort food”, if you will. This comforting opioidic byproduct, therefore, creates a cycle of addiction — and indeed, it’s difficult to think of a favorite food or meal (particularly one that we crave often) that doesn’t include some form of flour, bread, or dough.

Although gluten can give us comforting feelings, it also can wreak havoc on one’s body. This is because by some estimates, nearly 1 in 33 people are gluten intolerant. Other more conservative estimates say around 1 in 100. A person who is intolerant or allergic to gluten can experience a variety of symptoms and health problems, all seemingly unrelated. Everything from depression, anxiety, rashes and hives, iron and B-vitamin deficiencies, hair loss, thyroid dysfunction, osteoporosis, allergies, ulcers, digestive difficulties, canker sores, joint pain, learning disorders in children and failure to thrive to full-blown autoimmune disease or even cancer are all related to gluten intolerance.

One reason it is thought that gluten causes so much damage to the body is because it weakens the stomach lining. Gluten also blunts the villi that line our intestines, making it impossible for our bodies to acquire adequate nutrition. Over time, a weakened stomach allows food and bacteria particles into the blood stream. The combination of improper nutrition and toxins leaking into the body can cause damage to the entire body, including the nervous system and the vital organs.

Going on a gluten-free lifestyle diet is the only way to prevent, stop, or reverse any damage done by the grain protein. Going gluten-free allows a person’s gut to heal, which means no more unnatural leakage into the body, and for villi to heal thereby allowing for nutrient absorption to nourish a person’s entire body. Over time, and with proper diet, a person will no longer be vitamin and mineral deficient, and food will be digested and eliminated properly.


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By the way, Liz is one of those cellulite success stories who one day realized her cellulite no longer existed after she switched to Real Food. I asked her to write her Cellulite Story so we could glean some insight from her experience, but she said her cellulite wasn’t much to begin with and she never tried to actively treat it. It’s absence was just one of those things she “happened to notice” after being on real food for awhile.

(Now remember, ladies, we LIKE Liz! And who knows, maybe we’ll be saying the same thing someday!)

So thank you, Liz, for contributing to the case on cellulite!  What do you think, my fellow cellulite sleuths?  Do any of you recognize the symptoms of gluten intolerance in your own experience?  Do you think it could be related to your Cellulite Story?


Sources Liz used for her research:

*This post is part of Real Food Wednesday hosted at Kelly the Kitchen Kop and Fight Back Friday hosted at FoodRenegade.

A Cellulite Investigator Update

Thanks for stopping by The Cellulite Investigation.  Things are a little quite around here at the moment.  I’m taking an extended break as I get married and settle into married life and a new home.  Don’t worry, I’ll be back soon!

Comments

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karen@fitnessjourney says:
3/30/2010

That was a really interesting post Melissa. While I don't have this issue, I've heard it mentioned so often and was interested in learning more.

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Elizabeth Walling says:
3/30/2010

I sort of go back and forth on the gluten issue. I believe it is a real issue and that many people might benefit from eliminating (or reducing) gluten in their diet. However, sometimes I wonder if being gluten-sensitive isn't part of a bigger picture as well… basically what is the cause and what is the effect? Someone with strong digestive health might be able to handle gluten just fine, and the fact that fewer people have strong gut health these days may explain why more and more have gluten sensitivities. Going on the milk diet for 23 days was the longest I've every been gluten-free in my life, and I'm sure there was some benefit there. But I'm not sure if I'm ready to commit to elimating gluten altogether forever, ya know?

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I'm with you on that, Elizabeth. I still eat gluten, I just try to pay more attention to how my body reacts to certain foods. I also try to buy the best quality grain-based foods I can find, such as REAL sourdough or rye bread (yum!). I love the taste of sprouted corn tortillas better than the whole wheat version. I think you're right about improving digestive health to better handle grains.

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lizschau says:
3/30/2010

Thanks Karen!

Melissa and Elizabeth, Thanks for bringing this up, ladies — I have to say, I definitely agree with you. I think there are a few things at play here that is making gluten intolerance rates rise and cause people so much trouble:

1. We're not preparing hard-to-digest foods the right way. I heard Sally Fallon talk about a Celiac man who ate real fermented wheat bread and was fine because the grain was prepared the correct way and free of antinutrients and enzyme inhibtors. But the same is true for other foods with hard-to-digest proteins, like beans and legumes and nuts and other grains. We never soak, sprout, or ferment those. Our guts are so permeable with all the daily stress of these foods not being prepared correctly.
2. The gluten content is much higher in our modern foods than in ancient grains.
3. If we're eating industrial food, we're being exposed to astronimical amounts of gluten every day! This is not natural. I also like what Dr. Mercola believes, in that, we're overconsuming grains as it is and they were not part of our diet until only 10,000 years ago at the time of the first Agricultural Revolution (seconds ago, evolutionarily). Not everyone can tolerate grains, no matter how they are prepared.

So, for me, I think what makes sense is that gluten is not the only culprit — it all of the hard-to-digest proteins that we are not preparing correctly, and therefore cause damage to our bodies. And I guess what seems practical for the every-day person is to just eliminate gluten (or any other offending proteins, like casein, lectins, etc.), because not everyone is going to be willing to sprout their kidney beans or wheat (even though that would be my dream come true). :)

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Liz –It's funny that cutting out gluten is the most practical solution! But I know what you mean –it's harder to build up your digestive health and then take the time to learn how to properly prepare grains. For anyone who is wondering what we mean by "properly preparing grains," this article by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig is a good starting point:

Be Kind To Your Grains …and Your Grains Will Be Kind To You

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Anonymous says:
3/30/2010

Its less likely gluten and more likely all the meat/corn syrup in american diets. :)

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Amaryllis says:
3/30/2010

Thanks Liz and Melissa for that 'food for thought'. Certainly I feel that candida could be an underlying cause in my health issues. I've never thought for a moment about gluten though. I'd be prepared to really cut down, and I think if I could eat the way I would like to eat (if I wasn't so lazy/busy/addicted to sugar) gluten would hadly play a part. I couldn't cut it out completely because eating with friends, in our homes and also very often in restaurants etc, is not only part of the culture of the city, but something I value very highly and get lots of pleasure from. However, I can make choices which reduce my gluten intake. Will definately pay attention to how I feel with/without, before/after gluten.

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@Anon –I think you're right in that it's probably a combination of factors involved here. Like Elizabeth said, the gluten wouldn't be so hard to handle if we all had healthier digestive systems. But too often we lump fats and sugar together as "bad foods" without giving careful thought to each (not to mention the tendency to lump trans fats and saturated fats together, as well). If people want to be healthy, they cut down on both fats and sugar. Then when they start to feel better, they assume both fats and sugar are bad for you. I think the reality of the situation is more complicated than that.

@Amaryllis –That seems like a very sensible approach. A "diet" isn't likely to be effective if you deny yourself too many foods without having found other foods that you like even better. It's important to ENJOY eating! Plus, you can really learn a lot about your body if you take the time to carefully observe how you react to different foods (both when you eat them AND when you abstain).

BTW- Liz would know more about this, but some gluten foods like white flour do contribute to candida. I know this because my dog got the worst yeast infection in her ear after she stole a whole loaf of bread from the kitchen counter. Took her a few weeks to get over that one.

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Melissa B. says:
3/31/2010

Interesting thought…one of my cousins is gluten intolerant. I'm going to share this info with her. thanks!

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Kristin says:
3/31/2010

Every time I visit your blog, I realize more that I need to overhaul my diet!

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HeatherT says:
3/31/2010

Here are some facts that we know about gluten, mainly due to research by Dr. Fasano:

1. NO HUMAN BEING digests it completely. We lack the correct enzymes.

2. One particular gluten peptide "unlocks" the tight junctions in the gut. It does this in rats and rabbits too, not just humans.

3. The "tight junction" problem is more of a problem in some people than others, and this difference is very much genetic.

So while there likely are other factors, the fact is, wheat gluten has been a problem for humans since Roman and Egyptian times. It's nice to think that we can "do something" to keep eating our favorite opioid, but it's mainly wishful thinking, not based on any scientific tests. Celiac is usually silent, so a celiac saying "I'm ok if eat sourdough" is like a diabetic saying "I'm ok if I eat only honey" … without bothering with a glucose monitor. Once you totally get rid of the opioid, there isn't much point in eating wheat anyway, it's like beer without the booze.

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Heather –Beer without booze? Now you've got my attention ;)

I don't know much about Dr. Fasano's research. Just came across his website The University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research. I'll have to take some time to check it out Thanks for your comment!

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Elizabeth Walling says:
3/31/2010

Another approach is something like the GAPS diet, where you eliminate gluten (and other foods tough on digestion) for a period of time and then slowly reintroduce them as the digestive system heals. It takes a great deal of patience, but it provides an option so a gluten-intolerant person may one day be able to eat some gluten without having a terrible reaction (though it would never be a good idea to overindulge in it, I imagine).

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That book (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) is on my list of must-reads.

I also wanted to mention that Katie over at Kitchen Stewardship is doing some good research into the efficacy of soaking various grains. I'm keeping a close eye on what she comes up with as I've often wondered this same question.

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lizschau says:
4/1/2010

Amaryllis,

The reasons I have found that gluten can contribute to candida (and definitely caused my candida infection, over the course of my life) is because 1). gluten breaks down the gut and allows yeast to enter the body and blood stream, where it grows and becomes systemic, and 2). most foods that contain gluten are starchy, which feeds candida.

For me, eliminating gluten helped clear up so much of my infection, but not all of it (even still today), and I had to realize other foods were also a problem for me, mainly high-glycemic foods. But, if you're interested, I'd highly suggest eliminating as much gluten from your diet as you feel comfortable with. Elizabeth and Melissa suggested a great book: Gut and Psychology Syndrome… about how the gut either affords us health or disease. Great read!

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lizschau says:
4/1/2010

Heather,

Yeah, I completely understand what you're saying. It seems like there are two schools of thought on this one: those who think you can eat these hard-to-digest foods if and only if you prepare them correctly (soaking, sprouting, fermenting), and the other which says you should avoid these hard-to-digest foods completely.

I mentioned earlier that these foods (grains, specifically) entered our food system around the time of the first Agricultural Revolution about 10,000 years ago, which is just seconds ago, evolutionarily. So, for those with weak systems, it could be best to avoid these foods. For others who aren't chronically-ill, and who have good digestive health, eating them in traditional preparations could be tolerated. Personally, I think it all rests on the specific health of the individual.

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curiousfoodie says:
4/1/2010

I do believe it's a case by case basis. For me, when I went off gluten, I definitely went through a five day "withdrawal" period. Foggy thinking, body aches, cravings, etc. Then it was as if someone turned the light on in my body. I could think more clearly, my digestion was much better, my thyroid levels really reacted to not having gluten in my diet and my anxiety went down. Now, when my husband makes wheat toast, I actually can't stand the smell of it. My body has an aversion to it, and I never thought that would have happened because I always craved bread. So for me, I avoid it, but the rest of my family does well with soaking their gluten filled grains.

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Artsygemini –So interesting to hear different experiences with this. Sounds like you've had a dramatic reaction to limiting gluten. I'm constantly amazed at how everything in the body is related. Thanks for chiming in here!

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Kathy says:
4/2/2010

I am so glad to find your blog..thanks to seeing it on debbiedoos comments one day….Ok I so believe this and am so thankful for finding this blog. I have been googling cellulite for so long and never found anything like this. I have A blood type and cannot digest my food well. I have been on HCI (digestive enzymes) for years so I now get why I have cellulite so bad. I have been trying so hard to go gluten free after reading about it's effects, but will now from this minute on stop with gluten ..period! I think regardless if one is allergic (which I think is just that the body can't take any more of it and that's why in our 50's we really become intolerant) we will all become intolerant at some point. This gluten really should be taken off the market it is killing people. Thank you Thank you Thank you. Your new faithful reader

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Hi, Kathy. It sounds like your cellulite story is an interesting case. I've come across the subject of digestive enzymes quite a few times in my cellulite studies. In traditional diets, they consumed so many more enzymes than we get in our modern diet (through fermented foods and drinks, raw meat and dairy, etc). I can see how something like gluten intolerance could aggravate the condition of cellulite. I suspect that my fluoroderma (an "allergy" to fluoride) had the same effect. So glad you found us here at the Cellulite Investigation!

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I went gluten free for a week, but didn't really notice much difference in energy or digestion. It was an interesting experiment though!

I've been meaning to tell you, Melissa, that you can add me to the list of folks whose cellulite is diminishing after eating healthy fats for just over a year! Raw milk, whole fat dairy, lots of coconut oil, butter, tons of olive oil in dressings, etc. I was shocked when I checked after running into you on Twitter! What a FUN side effect of real food!!!!!
:) Katie

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Yay, Katie! Nothing makes my day like a good cellulite success story! Thanks for checking :)

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Anonymous says:
5/16/2010

Some people are soooo suggestible! Try daily yogurt for your "gut". Make it yourself with organic milk.

I think you will find that after menopause your cellulite will pause also. Estrogen is the culprit!

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Homemade yogurt is an excellent suggestion! Did you see this post about how to make kefir? It is even more effective than yogurt at restoring the healthy bacteria in the digestive system.

Estrogen is certainly involved, but some women see an explosion in their cellulite at menopause. Dr. Lionel Bissooon, author of The Cellulite Cure, says it's caused by low estrogen levels but other cellulite gurus say the opposite. We're still trying to work that one out here at the Cellulite Investigation. Thanks for contributing to the case!

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Cindysue says:
5/18/2010

Glad you are carrying on this discussion. It doesn't seem like there has been much discussion on cellulite and gluten, but here's my experience:

I went to a nutritionist last October/November who put me on an elimination diet for 10 days. The diet was no gluten, no oats, no dairy, no soy, no corn, no beef, no pork, no shellfish, no tofu, no eggs, no strawberries, no citrus, no dried fruits, no butter, no peanuts, no vinegar, no sugar, no chocolate, no honey, no caffeine, no alcohol, too many no's to list. Basically, I ate a lot of veggies, fruits, rice, nuts, lamb, chicken, turkey, and salmon.

During that 10 days, I lost about 10 pounds and visible signs of cellulite. I was able to fit into my skinniest of skinny jeans. I lost 4% overall bodyfat and 5% in my legs (according to DEXA). I have a lot of cellulite (started with 39% bodyfat in my legs) and the 5% reduction in bodyfat was clear in the mirror and in the fit of my clothes. It was great! But my willpower gave up and as soon as I was allowed to add foods back in, I went nuts. I made it through Thanksgiving but couldn't make it through the December month-long goodies at work. The cellulite came back, and I'm back in my big jeans. I haven't had the willpower to go back on the elimination diet to figure out the real culprit. I seemed to be OK adding back in the vinegar and citrus, the alcohol, and the shellfish. But it's all a blur after that. If I had to guess, I'd say it was gluten, and/or dairy, and maybe soy and/or corn. But only another round of elimination will help confirm.

Anybody else try this?

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Thanks for your comment, Cindysue. It's really helpful to hear about different experiences with diet and cellulite. Your story reminds me of this cellulite story from another CI reader.

It's encouraging that you saw such a dramatic improvement in only 10 days, even if it was virtually impossible to stay on such a restricted diet long term. At least now you have an idea of the foods that are giving you problems. Go with your instinct. It would be a lot easier to eliminate just a few foods (instead of that whole list) for a longer period to see how your body responds. Maybe you could start with just gluten, dairy, and soy and see how that goes.

Here's my experience with those foods. After I eliminated milk for a few months, I found I got an upset stomach when I tried to add it back in. The only milk I can drink now is fresh milk from a local farm. It still has all the enzymes and healthy bacteria in it that makes it easy to digest. And it's delicious!

As for the gluten, I tried an elimination diet with that as well. I didn't notice any major differences, so I'm not too strict about avoiding it now. But I do try to eat only quality gluten products (sourdough bread, homemade sourdough pancakes, sprouted tortillas, etc). This is how grain products were traditionally prepared because the sprouting/souring process helps break down the grain which means less work for your digestive system.

I avoid soy because of its effect on estrogen levels. Traditional societies only ate soy in small quantities and went to great lengths to ensure it was properly prepared (through fermentation, etc). If I'm going to eat soy, I stick to traditional forms like miso.

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Cindysue says:
5/18/2010

Thanks Melissa – very interesting. I posted a comment to her story. I forgot to mention that sugar is another culprit that wreaks havoc on my body. Life is so full of compromises….

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Sugar is a common culprit. I go for raw honey or maple syrup instead, and only in small amounts. After awhile, your taste buds adjust to less sweetness. Now I often prefer my yogurt plain and most restaurants desserts are way too sweet for me. Makes them a lot less tempting.

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Cindy says:
6/2/2011

This is quite an interesting article. Gluten has been known to cause a lot of problems, allergies, gut complications etc. I know for a fact that staying away from Gluten can reduce the excess weight we have, I guess eventually the cellulites too. But going completely gluten free is indeed a huge change for most of us. It means no more, bread, since bread comes from wheat, and the other grains mentioned above. :( really sad i’ve been trying to curb the cravings lol, then there’s sugar, too…Going on a wheat and dairy free diet takes a lot of discipline indeed, but based on the comments here, it looks like we really aren’t alone at all. And if its best for the body, then I guess I need to read more articles and comments like these to keep myself inspired. :)

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I like to read this post to keep me inspired: Real Life Cellulite Success Stories. Thanks for your comment, Cindy!

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clark says:
8/28/2011

i got more knowledge from your post , is gluten allergy symptoms have similar symptoms with celiac disease?

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Hi Clark. Gluten intolerance/sensitivity is different from celiac. There are different immune reactions involved: IgE, IgA, IgG, etc. Celiac is typically gastrointestinal symptoms, true allergy symptoms, and other illnesses as the symptoms.

Whereas, gluten intolerance can be a slow and gradual destruction of the gut (IgA), and cause brain fog, weight gain, depression, joint pain, as well as other diseases.

Ultimately, the symptoms for both can be so varied and difficult to discern so it’s best to do an elimination diet and get tested if you suspect you have one.

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Thanks, Liz!!

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Candace says:
10/23/2011

Excellent article on the basics of gluten intolerance. Very interesting details I’ve not read anywhere else. Thanks. I’m online this morning searching for cellulite/gluten connection. I started a semi-gluten free diet about a year ago, no breads or baking with flour but every now and then I’d make a dish using something with gluten. I was told by a doctor due to my thyroid issues I should be gluten-free, but in the past I had tried eliminating gluten and it never seemed to make much of a difference so I thought “oh, this is gluten-free enough for me.” I am already soy, caffeine, sugar, and mostly dairy and chemical free and in the past I’ve been a vegetarian. I’ve also done loofa scrubbing and various exercise regimes but cellulite remained. I always assumed cellulite was just part of my genetics especially since my diet has always been fairly healthy. I never gave cellulite much thought unless I had to put on a bathing suit which I avoid! Then about a week ago I decided to take steps to heal this leaky gut idea. I’ve also been reading it’s not enough to be 90% gluten-free as the effects of gluten will remain in your body for up to three weeks or more. I’m now 100% gluten free, actually 100% grain free. It’s actually quite easy although at first there was a bit of a re-education learning curve and realizing how much food has gluten in it. (I’m still finding out weird facts like tuna, chili powder and hamburger are often packed or made with gluten!) Anyway, my cellulite has disappeared! And that’s in addition to all the other health improvements I’m experiencing. It’s not that hard eating fresh vegetables, fruits and meats. Yeah, I might miss seafood fettucini or Thai curry, but I’m experimenting with various combinations to create similiar recipes using real food. It was way harder to give up caffeine or sugar. Good luck to all, and thanks again for the article on gluten.

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Candace, this is such exciting news! Thank you!! How long did it take for your cellulite to disappear once you eliminated gluten completely? Did you do anything else at the same time that you think might have affected it, too? I’m going to add your comment to our list of Cellulite Success Stories right now. YAY!!

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Susan says:
11/15/2011

Great site! I landed here after searching for gluten intolerance. I for one can say, that reducing my gluten intake has helped in so many ways. I use to get monthly yeast infections and they are so uncomfortable and annoying.

I already knew I had wheat intolerance, but since I loved pasta, I just wanted to forget that I had an intolerance. By the way, I am allergic to dairy. So I live a dairy-free life.

One month, we bought so much brown rice from the Japanese market, we ate rice with everything. That month, I had no yeast infection. Just to test things out, after a month of eating rice dishes, I ate a sandwich and then I started to feel my body react to it. Ever since then, I limit my gluten intake. I haven’t completely eliminated it, but I would say 90% and my body feels so much better.

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Thanks for your comment, Susan. According to Dr. Christiane Northrup, a large percentage of women are sensitive to gluten and don’t know it. Good on you for figuring it out before any of the more blatant symptoms developed! Did you happen to notice any improvements in the cellulite department when I you started to limit your gluten intake?

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trueself says:
7/10/2012

Gluten and cellulite connection. I have a gluten sensitivity and have been gluten free for more then two years…made huge health improvements but did nothing to improve my cellulite. Everyone is different of course. Caffeine free is the ONLY thing that has made huge improvements in my cellulite for me (including no tea)…even when only 1-2 cups/day.

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That makes sense, trueself. What works for one women wouldn’t necessarily work for another. Everyone has a different history. Each of us has to figure out our particular brand of kryptonite and how to defeat it.

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Hayley says:
5/9/2013

Four weeks after giving up wheat (I have IBS and it’s a trigger for me) the backs of my thighs that I had noticed had quite bad cellulite are now so much better! Not smooth but not far off! That said also cut out caffeine so it may well be a mixture of the two

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Danae says:
1/26/2014

Overall I think we became to ‘denaturalised’ in our habits and food – that the body cannot cope and is then just ‘seemingly allergic’ to one part but I feel it is systemic and only a way back to natures way – organic, clean & fresh will bring us back into her harmony. The starting point for us may be to see gluten, fat or whatever – but i feel only a wholistic approach will bring balance.

However, I just found this approach to Cellulite elimination and wondered if anybody has had experience with these supplements etc.? – This is from Nadine Artemis and her natural cosmetic website. Most of it we already know… and Melissa investigated it – but perhaps it would be interesting to do this systemic approach?:

Cellulite is an accumulation of cell clusters that solidify and harden as the surrounding tissue loses its connectivity and elasticity, due to poor circulation and toxins stored in these deposits and excess lipids. Thin and active people can have cellulite, men too. Cellulite may signify sluggish cell functioning, lymph and/or circulatory systems from an over exposure to toxic chemicals that can’t find a way to be processed by the body.

Congested cellulite areas contain toxins that were not eliminated by the liver. Many of the toxins come from food and water additives, pesticides and synthetic body care products which affect the body in many ways including leaving many xenoestrogens in the fat tissues; this is a foreign type of estrogen that also creates an estrogen imbalance in the body.

To evolve the body’s pattern in this area a few lifestyle changes are necessary:

Massage – promotes lymphatic circulation, which helps remove toxins, and increases blood supply, which carries oxygen to the area and may help break up the hardened skin cells of cellulite.

Nutrition – Digestion of nutrients is key; clear any constipation, eating real, whole foods (less carbs and gluten); healthy fats, omega 3’s, virgin coconut oil

Water – get pure and drink plenty of it (www.findaspring.com)

Sweat & Move – do something that makes you break a sweat each day; an infrared sauna is perfect for sweating and releasing toxins. Move and groove in ways that inspire you.

Dry Brushing – one of the simplest things to do daily to stimulate the immune system, lymph and create beautiful skin. Boost brushing with our Lymph Tonic

Supplements – Indole 3 Carbinol (helps to get rid of excess estrogen in the body), glutathione a powerful (fat soluble and water soluble) antioxidant that helps release toxins; carnitine is amino acid that helps to build collagen and retain elasticity.

If these changes are made cellulite will clear even without using the special Cellulite Formula. The potent combination of essential oils in this formula penetrate the lipid layers, stimulating the lymph and circulatory systems, are astringent and tone the skin. The essential oils in Cell-U-Light further help to eliminate cellulite from our systems with their diuretic and detoxification benefits. Massaging into areas provides circulation, lymph stimulation, strengthens the connective tissue and helps in breaking down the congested deposits. Focus on special areas for 4-6 weeks.

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